Politics and Strategy

Interview

Washington's Egypt Dilemma

Michele Dunne interviewed by Zachary Laub

Two years since the Egyptian military deposed President Mohammed Morsi, human rights abuses are being committed at an unprecedented level, but the United States remains deeply invested in maintaining military ties with the country, says expert Michele Dunne.

See more in Egypt; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Article

Mutual Respect for International Laws Can Keep the Peace Between China and the U.S.

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
U.S.-Asia Law Institute

Although China’s increasingly “assertive” international conduct has naturally stirred widespread concern in both Asia and the US, especially regarding the South China Sea, an overview of Beijing’s foreign policy suggests a less alarming perspective. In some major subjects, such as environmental pollution and climate change, there are good prospects for Beijing’s cooperation with the United States and other nations.

See more in United States; China; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Foreign Affairs Article

The Decline of International Studies

Author: Charles King

In October 2013, the U.S. Department of State eliminated its funding program for advanced language and cultural training on Russia and the former Soviet Union. Created in 1983 as a special appropriation by Congress, the so-called Title VIII Program had supported generations of specialists working in academia, think tanks, and the U.S. government itself. But as a State Department official told the Russian news service RIA Novosti at the time, “In this fiscal climate, it just didn’t make it.”

See more in Global; History and Theory of International Relations

Foreign Affairs Article

Too Many Secrets

Authors: Ron Wyden and John Dickas

One of the most persistent challenges of U.S. national security policy is balancing 
the short-term benefits of secrecy with the long-term benefits of openness. Government agencies responsible for dealing with national security threats will often be more effective if they are allowed to keep certain details about their activities secret.

See more in United States; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

Turkey Comes Undone

Author: Steven A. Cook
The American Interest

Expectations of democracy in Turkey following the recent general elections are premature, writes CFR’s Steven Cook. Instead, political paralysis and instability will mark the upcoming phase as parties scramble to build a coalition government.

See more in Turkey; Elections

Op-Ed

In Defeat, Erdogan Shows Respect for Democracy

Author: Ed Husain
Newsweek

The ruling party in Turkey expected to win a majority in the latest parliamentary elections. For 13 years, under the iron grip of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the AK Party has been the unstoppable force in Turkish politics.This weekend’s result was a blow to the president of Turkey, but excellent news for democracy in Turkey and beyond.

See more in Turkey; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Elections

Primary Sources

USA FREEDOM Act of 2015

This legislation was introduced to Congress on April 28, 2015, as H.R. 2048 Uniting and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ensuring Effective Discipline Over Monitoring Act of 2015. President Obama signed it into law on June 2, 2015. The act is an overhaul of the National Security Council's intelligence gathering program, the largest reform of the program since the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

See more in United States; Intelligence; Organization of Government

Op-Ed

Will China Close Its Doors?

Authors: Jerome A. Cohen and Ira Belkin
The New York Times

In this op-ed, coauthored with Ira Belkin, Cohen argues that a draft law targeting foreign institutions — including universities, museums, athletic and cultural groups, professional associations and all nonprofit social organizations established outside of mainland China — makes clear that Beijing has become much less welcoming.

See more in China; Nonstate Actors and Nongovernmental Organizations; Politics and Strategy