Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Can Washington Win Over the Arab Street?

Author: Amaney Jamal

In my book Of Empires and Citizens, I argue that at the height of the period of authoritarian rule in the Middle East, Arab societies were divided between those people who benefited from their leaders' relationship with the United States, and therefore sought to preserve the dictatorships, and those who did not, and therefore sought democracy.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Cuba After Communism

Authors: Julia E. Sweig and Michael Bustamante

Cuba has entered a new era of economic reform that defies easy comparison to post-Communist transitions elsewhere. Washington should take the initiative and establish a new diplomatic and economic modus vivendi with Havana.

See more in Cuba; Sanctions; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

In Defense of Citizens United

Authors: Glenn Hubbard and Tim Kane

Hardly the blow to democracy that many painted it as, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United will make American politics more competitive, less beholden to party bosses, and more responsive to the public at large. It may even help break the fiscal stalemate strangling the U.S. economy.

See more in United States; Elections

Foreign Affairs Article

India's Feeble Foreign Policy

Author: Manjari Chatterjee Miller

The world may expect great things from India, but as extensive reporting reveals, Indians themselves turn out to be deeply skeptical about their country's potential. That attitude, plus New Delhi's dysfunctional foreign-policy bureaucracy, prevent long-term planning of the sort China has mastered -- and are holding India back.

See more in India; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

The Clinton Legacy

Author: Michael Hirsh

As secretary of state, Hillary Clinton helped restore America's standing in the world, but she left office with no signature achievement. If she gets her way, her tenure as the country's top diplomat will come to be seen simply as a stepping-stone to the presidency

See more in United States; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Foreign Affairs Article

Bolívar's Botched Bequest

Author: Ilan Stavans

The Venezuelan revolutionary Simon Bolívar has a remarkably elastic legacy. Ever since his death in 1830, Latin American politicians across the political spectrum have claimed to be his rightful heir. What Bolívar left behind, it turns out, was less a coherent set of ideas than an abstract vision of Latin American unity -- a vision that remains impossible today.

See more in Venezuela; History and Theory of International Relations

Foreign Affairs Article

Beyond the Pivot

Author: Kevin Rudd

The Obama administration's "pivot" to Asia made sense, because China was starting to doubt U.S. staying power. Now that Washington has sent Beijing a clear message it will be around for the long haul, however, the time has come for the two countries to deepen and institutionalize their relationship in order to secure Asia's lasting peace and prosperity.

See more in China; United States; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Breaking Up Is Not Hard to Do

Author: Husain Haqqani

Instead of continuing their endless battling, the United States and Pakistan should acknowledge that their interests simply do not converge enough to make them strong partners. Giving up the fiction of an alliance would free up Washington to explore new ways of achieving its goals in South Asia. And it would allow Islamabad to finally pursue its regional ambitions -- which would either succeed once and for all or, more likely, teach Pakistani officials the limitations of their country's power.

See more in Diplomacy and Statecraft; Pakistan

Foreign Affairs Article

Japan's Cautious Hawks

Author: Gerald L. Curtis

The election of the hawkish Shinzo Abe as Japan's prime minister has the world worrying that Tokyo is about to part with its pacifist strategy of the last 70 years. But Japan's new leaders are pragmatic, and so long as the United States does not waver in its commitment to the country's defense, they are unlikely chart a new course.

See more in Japan; Diplomacy and Statecraft