Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Getting the GOP's Groove Back

Author: Bret Stephens

After their loss last year, Republicans are grappling over what to do next -- and when it comes to foreign policy, small-government conservatives worried about debt are squaring off against big-military conservatives fearful of defense cuts. Fortunately, the GOP does not need a total makeover; what it needs is a renegotiated modus vivendi between the two competing camps, each of which has valuable things to teach the other.

See more in Elections; Congresses, Parliaments, National Legislatures

Foreign Affairs Article

Smart Shift

Authors: Shawn Brimley and Ely Ratner

A recent essay by Robert Ross characterized the Obama administration's "pivot" to Asia as a hostile, knee-jerk response to Chinese aggression. But the shift was not aimed at any one country; it was an acknowledgment that the United States had underinvested in a strategically significant region.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Politics and Strategy; United States

Foreign Affairs Article

Mexico's Age of Agreement

Authors: Héctor Aguilar Camín and Jorge G. Castañeda

Mexico has long been hostage to unchallengeable traditions: its nationalist approach to oil wealth, overly sensitive attitude toward sovereignty, entrenched labor monopolies, persistent corruption, and self-serving bureaucracy.

See more in Mexico; Elections

Foreign Affairs Article

The Cuban Missile Crisis at 50

Author: Graham Allison

Fifty years ago, the Cuban missile crisis brought the world to the brink of nuclear disaster. Every president since John F. Kennedy has tried to learn from what happened back then. Today, it can help U.S. policymakers understand what to do -- and what not to do -- about Iran, North Korea, China, and presidential decision-making in general.

See more in Cuba; History and Theory of International Relations; Proliferation

Foreign Affairs Article

Hegemony and After

Author: Robert O. Keohane

Yet another bout of worry about long-term U.S. decline has generated yet another countersurge of defensive optimism. What new books by Robert Kagan and Robert Lieber miss, however, is the critical role played by multilateral institutions in the perpetuation of the United States' global leadership.

See more in United States; International Organizations and Alliances; History and Theory of International Relations