Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

3 Things to Watch for in Putin’s State of the Union Speech

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

Senior Fellow Stephen Sestanovich argues that to understand where Vladimir Putin will lead Russia, viewers should look to three things in his state of the union address: how he defines the country’s present problems, what he proposes as solutions to them, and how he sets out his long-term vision for Russia.

See more in Russian Federation; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Primary Sources

Department of Defense: Report on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

In December 20, 2013, the Department of Defense was tasked with reporting improvements on the prevention and response to sexual assault in the military. It released its report on November 25, 2014. NY Senator Karen Gillibrand responded, saying data from the study that indicated that sixty-three percent of victims report being retaliated against for coming forward about their assault.

See more in United States; Human Rights; Organization of Government

Audio

U.S.-China Relations

Elizabeth C. Economy, CFR’s C.V. Starr senior fellow and director for Asia studies, discusses Chinese President Xi Jinping’s reforms in his first two years in office and what they mean for U.S.-China relations, as part of CFR's Academic Conference Call series.

See more in China; Politics and Strategy

Research Links

International Affairs Indexes and Country Rankings

These rankings include datasets and studies which track the status of a country and compare countries based on different indicators, in the areas of conflict, economics, education, energy, environment, health, human rights, politics, and technology. Critiques of these types of indexes are included, describing why they can be detrimental to development progress and how comparison exercises could be improved.

See more in Global; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

The Death of Strategy

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

Julia Sweig reflects in her column this week on the challenges in U.S.-Latin American relations, and the failure of Washington to create basic guideposts based on a realistic assessment of the political, economic, security and demographic dimensions of our interdependence, our fault-lines and the opportunities therein

See more in Latin America and the Caribbean; Politics and Strategy