Presidents and Chiefs of State


Is Netanyahu Right About How to Bargain?

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress last week was described here and there as “maximalist”—meaning, he insisted on the best imaginable terms for any agreement with Iran about its nuclear program. Because “Maximalist” is the title of my book on U.S. foreign policy since World War II, people have asked me whether Bibi’s approach isn’t the one the United States used for its own tough negotiations.

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Media Conference Call: Assessing Netanyahu's Speech

Speakers: Robert M. Danin and Ray Takeyh
Presider: Gideon Rose

CFR experts Robert Danin and Ray Takeyh discuss Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's March 3, 2015 speech before a joint session of U.S. Congress. Experts discuss U.S.-Israel relations, Prime Minister Netanyahu's strategic objectives, and ongoing talks over Iran's nuclear program.

See more in Israel; Iran; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament


The Strategic Genius of Iran's Supreme Leader

Author: Ray Takeyh
Washington Post

On the surface, there is not much that commends Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. An anti-Semite, he has frequently questioned the Holocaust and defamed Israel in despicable terms. As a conspiracy theorist, he endlessly weaves strange tales about the United States and its intentions. As a national leader, he has ruthlessly repressed Iran’s once-vibrant civil society while impoverishing its economy.

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Obama's Anti-ISIS AUMF: A Classic Muddle

Author: Max Boot

Yesterday I wrote “here we go again” with President Obama agonizing over another major foreign-policy decision–whether or not to arm Ukraine–even as our enemies push ahead with great determination and cunning. Today we are seeing yet another Obama MO: the tendency, once endless administration deliberations are finished, to produce a split-the-difference solution that doesn’t accomplish as much as it should.

See more in United States; Military Operations; Presidents and Chiefs of State