Public Health Threats and Pandemics

Foreign Affairs Article

Ebola’s Lessons

Author: Laurie Garrett

In a biological sense, last year’s Ebola epidemic, which struck West Africa, spilled over into the United States and Europe, and has to date led to more than 27,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths, was a great surprise. Local health and political leaders did not know of the presence of the hemorrhagic fever virus in the 35,000-square-mile Guinea Forest Region, and no human cases had ever been identified in the region prior to the outbreak.

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Primary Sources

U.S. Global Change Research Program: The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States

U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) released this draft of its report Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States on April 7, 2015, in response to President Obama's Climate Action Plan. The final report, expected to be published in early 2016, is "intended to present a comprehensive, evidence-based, and, where possible, quantitative estimation of observed and projected public health impacts related to climate change in the United States."

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The Emerging Global Health Crisis, Interactive

Author: Thomas J. Bollyky
Producer: Andrei Henry

The gravest health threats facing low- and middle-income countries are not the plagues, parasites, and blights that dominate the news cycle and international relief efforts. They are the everyday diseases -- heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory illnesses -- we understand and could address, but fail to take action against.

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I’m Back From Liberia and Under a (Self-Imposed) Quarantine in Brooklyn

Author: Laurie Garrett

Going from Monrovia, Liberia to Belgium to New York meant enduring power outages, fever checks, Ebola questionnaires, and the hallway from hell. But the hysteria that dominated America's view of Ebola and the open disdain for travelers from the hard-hit region that was the norm in the United States in late October have yielded to what seems a very rational, smart way of keeping track of returnees

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