Public Health Threats and Pandemics

Article

Review: ‘Zika’ Tracks the Trajectory of an Epidemic

Author: Laurie Garrett
The New York Times

If a publisher had come to me four months ago and asked me to write a book about the Zika crisis in just 30 days, I’m not sure I would have had the courage to say yes, as Donald G. McNeil Jr. did. So many assumptions written in March or April could prove wrong by June or August that the challenge of quickly producing a book on Zika would seem too risky — given that there will also be sleep deprivation, speed writing, high-velocity editing and rewrite ahead.

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Foreign Affairs Article

Can't Have It Both Ways in Iran

Authors: Reuel Marc Gerecht and Ray Takeyh

As the U.S. campaign season wears on, both Republicans and Democrats are pledging to stay tough on Iran. Such promises aren’t new. Last summer, as the Barack Obama administration unveiled its nuclear agreement, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry assured skeptics that the United States would sustain essential sanctions that punish Tehran for its aid to terrorists, regional aggression, and human rights abuses.

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Op-Ed

‘Pandemic,’ by Sonia Shah

Author: Laurie Garrett
New York Times

Over Christmas, headlines across Britain screamed that Victorian-era diseases had returned. The past five years had apparently witnessed a 136 percent increase in scarlet fever cases, a remarkable 300 percent rise in the confirmed ­cases of cholera along with reported occurrences of other once-vanquished diseases like tuberculosis, measles and whooping cough.

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Foreign Affairs Article

Ebola’s Lessons

Author: Laurie Garrett

In a biological sense, last year’s Ebola epidemic, which struck West Africa, spilled over into the United States and Europe, and has to date led to more than 27,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths, was a great surprise. Local health and political leaders did not know of the presence of the hemorrhagic fever virus in the 35,000-square-mile Guinea Forest Region, and no human cases had ever been identified in the region prior to the outbreak.

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