Rule of Law

Op-Ed

Wrong Side of the Law

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen states, "The Chinese government's current suppression of rising internet protests against its barbaric abuse of the blind 'barefoot lawyer' Chen Guangcheng raises fundamental questions about the impact of legal reforms on real life in China."

See more in Rule of Law; China; Internet Policy

Primary Sources

Magna Carta

The Magna Carta is an English charter dating to 1215. The National Archives calls the Magna Carta a “charter of ancient liberties guaranteed by a king to his subjects” and gives this history of the document:

“King John of England agreed, in 1215, to the demands of his barons and authorized that handwritten copies of Magna Carta be prepared on parchment, affixed with his seal, and publicly read throughout the realm. Thus he bound not only himself but his "heirs, for ever" to grant "to all freemen of our kingdom" the rights and liberties the great charter described. With Magna Carta, King John placed himself and England's future sovereigns and magistrates within the rule of law.”

See more in United Kingdom; Rule of Law

Op-Ed

Seeking Shelter

Authors: Jerome A. Cohen and Yu Han
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen and Yu Han discuss the recent release of the draft comprehensive revision of China's Criminal Procedure Law (CPL).

See more in China; Rule of Law

Op-Ed

In Safe Hands?

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen says the Chinese government's assurances for due process in its prosecution of Lai Changxing, the mastermind behind a smuggling and bribery scandal, are far from being 'strict, clear, and unequivocal.'

See more in China; Rule of Law

Op-Ed

No Place Like Home

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen says that in Ai Weiwei's continued detention, Chinese police are violating at will a provision of the law that allows them to hold a suspect only under strict conditions.

See more in China; Rule of Law