Society and Culture


War Goes Viral

Authors: Emerson T. Brooking and P.W. Singer
The Atlantic

Social media has altered the nature of war, argue Emerson T. Brooking and P.W. Singer. The viral propaganda of the self-declared Islamic State, Russian disinformation campaigns, and Chinese cyber-nationalism are all indications of a more fundamental shift in conflict—a revolution that threatens to catch U.S. policymakers and social media companies off guard. 

See more in Global; Technology and Foreign Policy; Social Media


America Is Turning Into a Confederacy of Dunces

Author: Max Boot
Foreign Policy

Why is Donald Trump within a whisker of the White House? Two-thirds of the country can’t even name the three branches of government. If we don’t revitalize civics education, we will be entrusting our future to people who know little to nothing of the way our government works. The way we are going, one of these days a Bernie Sanders or, heaven help us, a Donald Trump will not just be a candidate for president. He will actually become president, writes Max Boot.

See more in United States; Elections; Society and Culture


Republicans Are Paying the Price for Their Addiction to Their Own Media

Author: Max Boot
Washington Post

This election year is memorable for many reasons but among the most important is showing Republicans the cost of their infatuation with “alternative” news sources. The right’s addiction to its own news has become destructive. Whether Trump wins or loses, conservatives need to re-evaluate their infatuation with “alternative” news sources that tell them what they want to hear and join a more mainstream conversation that includes different points of view.

See more in United States; Elections; Media and Foreign Policy


Civil War Within Nigerian Islam

Author: John Campbell
The Cipher Brief

There is a leadership struggle underway within Boko Haram, the violent, extremist movement that has claimed more than 20,000 lives since 2011 and destabilized the secular Nigerian state and its neighbors. The personal struggle between Abubakar Shekau and Abu Musab al-Barnawi reflects in part the rivalry between Boko Haram and a splinter group, “Ansaru,” and are part of a complex, intra-Muslim conflict across the Sahel, including competition between rival al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and the Islamic State.

See more in Nigeria; Religion


The Reality Anti-Muslim Rhetoric Ignores

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

In the wake of the horror in Orlando, discussion has once again focused on the idea of placing a 'ban' on all Muslims entering the United States. The idea is to keep Muslims out of America and to go further by banning all entrants from countries with a "proven history of terrorism" against this country.

See more in United States; Religion

Foreign Affairs Article

Israel Among the Nations

Author: Robert Danin

In 1996, Ehud Barak, who was then Israel’s foreign minister and would later serve as prime minister, charac­terized Israel as “a modern and prosperous villa in the middle of the jungle.” Twenty years later, as political turmoil and vio­lence engulf the Middle East, that harsh metaphor captures better than ever the way most Israelis see their country and its place in the region. 

See more in Israel; Society and Culture

Foreign Affairs Article

Israel’s Second-Class Citizens

Author: As'ad Ghanem

When the world focuses on the Arab-Israeli crisis today, the plight of the 4.6 million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank gets most of the attention. But another pressing question haunts Israeli politics: the status and future of Israel’s own Arab citizens, who number around 1.7 million and make up around 21 percent of its popu­lation. 

See more in Israel; Society and Culture

Foreign Affairs Article

Russia's Perpetual Geopolitics

Author: Stephen Kotkin

For half a millennium, Russian foreign policy has been characterized by soaring ambitions that have exceeded the country’s capabilities. Beginning with the reign of Ivan the Terrible in the sixteenth century, Russia managed to expand at an average rate of 50 square miles per day for hundreds of years, eventually covering one-sixth of the earth’s landmass. By 1900, it was the world’s fourth- or fifth-largest industrial power and the largest agricultural producer in Europe.

See more in Russian Federation; Society and Culture