Society and Culture

Op-Ed

On Immigration, Look to the States

Authors: Jagdish N. Bhagwati and Francisco Rivera-Batiz
Los Angeles Times

Jagdish Bhagwati and Francisco Rivera-Batiz argue that the United States must adopt a more humane policy regarding illegal immigrants. They argue that top-down approaches such as sanctions, border security, and punishments are not effective. Instead, they propose a shift to a bottom-up reform based on state competition.

See more in United States; Immigration

Primary Sources

Open Letter to President Obama and Congress from U.S. Technology Companies

Several U.S. technology companies, Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, Twitter, Yahoo, LinkedIn, and AOL, published an open letter to the government in newspapers on December 9, 2013. The letter requests an end bulk collection of user data, including email, address books, and video chats, and lists accountability and transparency principles the companies support.

See more in United States; Privacy; Organization of Government

Audio

Ending the Practice of Child Marriage

Speaker: Rachel B. Vogelstein

Rachel Vogelstein, CFR's fellow for women and foreign policy, and Ruth Messinger, president of American Jewish World Service, discuss ending the practice of child marriage at the American Academy of Religion 2013 Annual Meeting, as part of CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Initiative.

See more in Global; Women; Religion

Foreign Affairs Article

A Kinder, Gentler Immigration Policy

Authors: Jagdish Bhagwati and Francisco Rivera-Batiz

Even if immigration reform managed to get through congress, it would do little to stem illegal immigration or improve the plight of the undocumented. So policymakers should shift their focus to a more humane, bottom-up approach: letting states compete for illegal immigrants.

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Must Read

New Yorker: What Will It Cost to Cover China?

Author: Evan Osnos

"Today, the story is at once more accessible and more dangerous. To cover China is to chronicle the world's second-largest economy, a rising superpower, and one-fifth of the world's population. China is so central to our economic lives that journalists have had no choice but to engage China with greater technical analysis and precision."

See more in China; Media and Foreign Policy

Must Read

Wall Street Journal: Latin Migrants Shift Sights From U.S. to Neighbors

Author: Miriam Jordan

"In a noticeable and important shift in global migratory patterns, millions of migrant workers are no longer relying on the U.S. as heavily as they did for better-paying jobs that allowed them to send money home to families in Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia. Instead, they have moved more to developing economies, creating a shift in money transfers out of countries like Chile, Brazil and Malaysia."

See more in Latin America and the Caribbean; Immigration

Must Read

Financial Times: The Ghost at China’s Third Plenum: Demographics

Author: David Pilling

"It is hard to overstate how fast China is ageing. Life expectancy has more than doubled from 35 in 1949 to 75 today, a miraculous achievement. Meanwhile, the fertility rate has plummeted to 1.5 or lower, far below the 2.1 needed to keep a population stable. Cai Fang, a demographer at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, says the country will have moved from labour surplus to labour shortage at the fastest pace in history."

See more in China; Aging

Transcript

HBO History Makers Series with Ted Koppel

Speaker: Ted Koppel
Presider: Ken Auletta

Ted Koppel reflects on his career and the changing nature of journalism and social media.

The Home Box Office History Makers Series focuses particular attention on the contributions made by a prominent individual at a critical juncture in international relations. Recent speakers in the series include Mo Ibrahim, Paul Volcker, Madeleine Albright, and Stanley McChrystal.

See more in United States; Society and Culture