History and Theory of International Relations

Video

The Sinews of Power: Rediscovering the Foundations of National Strength

Speaker: Paul M. Kennedy
Presider: Richard N. Haass

Watch Paul M. Kennedy, director of International Security Studies and the Dilworth Professor of History at Yale University, analyze characteristics of great powers and what constitutes national strength.

This meeting was cosponsored with the National History Center, an initiative of the American Historical Association.

See more in History and Theory of International Relations

Audio

The Sinews of Power: Rediscovering the Foundations of National Strength (Audio)

Speaker: Paul M. Kennedy
Presider: Richard N. Haass

Listen to Paul M. Kennedy, director of International Security Studies and the Dilworth Professor of History at Yale University, analyze characteristics of great powers and what constitutes national strength.

This meeting was cosponsored with the National History Center, an initiative of the American Historical Association.

See more in History and Theory of International Relations

Op-Ed

Twenty Years After the Fall

Author: James M. Goldgeier
Washington Times

The fall of the Berlin Wall was not the only significant international development of 1989, writes James Goldgeier. The withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan and the Tiananmen Square massacre in China signified the emergence of two new international challenges: failed states and illiberal capitalism, each of which has "vexed" the United States for the past two decades.

See more in Germany; History and Theory of International Relations; Russian Federation