Terrorist Organizations and Networks

Primary Sources

Final Communique from International Conference on Peace and Security in Iraq

The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs hosted delegations from twenty-six countries to support Iraq in its efforts to eliminate the terrorist group Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The final communique, released September 15, 2014, acknowledged the newly formed government in Iraq and agreed to provide military assistance and to implementing UN Security Council resolutions regarding violations of human rights, recruitment and radicalization of terrorists, and terrorist financing.

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Primary Sources

An Open Letter: The Hizballah Program

Hezbollah was founded in Lebanon in 1982 as a Shiite Muslim political group with a militant wing. On February 16, 1985, Hezbollal published its manifesto,"Nass al-Risala al-Maftuha allati wajahaha Hizballah ila-l-Mustad'afin fi Lubnan wa-l-Alam," which explains the characteristics of its membership and its goals. A slightly abridged translation was provided in the Jerusalem Quarterly in the fall of 1988.

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Testimony

Hamas’ Benefactors: A Network of Terror

Author: Steven A. Cook

The ties between American allies and Hamas—a terrorist organization—contribute to instability and violence, CFR Senior Fellow Steven A. Cook told the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittees on the Middle East and North Africa and Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. Under political, financial, and military pressure from Israel, the United States, the Palestinian Authority, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, Hamas has found relief in support from Qatar and Turkey.

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Video

9/11 Perspectives: Splinters in the Global Islamist Movement

Speaker: Ed Husain

This video is part of a special Council on Foreign Relations series that explores how
9/11 changed international relations and U.S. foreign policy. In this video, Ed Husain, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, who was previously a member and strategist for radical Islamist organizations in London discusses the impact of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on Islamist extremism as well as global counter-terrorism efforts. "The most important thing that happened after 9/11," says Husain, "is not just the so-called 'War on Terror', but more importantly, the unspoken and often unheard developments within Islamist extremism globally." Husain argues that "the global Islamist movement then split into two, immediately after 9/11," into global jihadists like al-Qaeda on one side and non-violent extremists on the other.

See more in 9/11 Impact; Terrorist Organizations and Networks; United States