Trade

Article

Trade, Social Preferences and Regulatory Cooperation

Authors: Thomas J. Bollyky and Petros C. Mavroidis
Journal of International Economic Law

Global value chains have changed the way that the world trades. The World Trade Organization (WTO) should embrace the confluence of shared social preferences and trade, where it may exist such as digital trade, food and drug safety, and climate smart-agriculture, as a motivation for advancing international regulatory cooperation. To do that, changes to the corporate governance of the WTO are needed to facilitate the use of plurilateral agreements and to multilateralize progress already occurring bilaterally and regionally.

See more in Global; Trade; International Organizations and Alliances

Article

Trump May Threaten a Trade War Over NAFTA, but His Options Are Limited

Author: Edward Alden
World Politics Review

When then-President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in a White House ceremony in December 1993, he called it “a defining moment” for the United States and praised Mexico and Canada as “our partners in the future that we are trying to make together.” All three countries had made what then seemed like an irreversible decision to marry their economic futures. Yet today, less than a quarter-century later, those bonds are badly fraying.

See more in Americas; Trade

Op-Ed

The End of an Era

Author: Edward Alden
USNews

“In selecting a president who campaigned openly on trade and immigration restrictions, the United States has called a halt to a half century of openness. Whether the next four years become a wholesale retreat from the world or merely a pause for retooling now rests on the shoulders of perhaps the most mercurial and least-experienced man ever elected to the nation's highest office,” argues Edward Alden after the election of Donald Trump. 

See more in United States; Trade; Immigration

Article

America’s Home-Made Raw Deal for Workers

Author: Edward Alden
The Globalist

A few weeks into President-elect Trump’s transition, Edward Alden says, “it is a new day in U.S. trade relations with the world. A nation that has long seen trade as a ‘win-win’—good for American companies, good for Americans, good for the world—is now asking a different question: what’s in it for us?” 

See more in United States; Trade; Labor

Article

How to Help Workers Laid Low by Trade—and Why We Haven’t

Author: Edward Alden
PBS NewsHour

"The failure to help American workers adjust to the new scale and intensity of global competition is one of the bigger mistakes of U.S. government economic policy in the last half century, one that has resulted in an enormous waste of human capacity and in eroding popular support for international trade and U.S. engagement with the world,” says Edward Alden in PBS NewsHour. 

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News Release

U.S. Has Failed to Ease Adjustment to Globalization and Free Trade, Says Alden in New Book

In Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, Council on Foreign Relations Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow Edward Alden explains why the political consensus in support of trade liberalization has collapsed, and how to correct the course.  The United States has contributed more than any other nation to writing the rules that created the competitive global economy of today, helping support stronger growth in much of the world. Yet successive U.S. administrations have done far too little to help Americans succeed under those rules, says Alden.

See more in United States; China; Globalization; Trade

Op-Ed

The Government Failed U.S. Workers on Global Trade. It Must Do Better on Technology.

Authors: Vivek Wadhwa and Edward Alden
The Washington Post

“Much more even than globalization, technology is going to create upheaval and destroy industries and jobs. This can be for the better, helping us create new and more interesting jobs or freeing up time for leisure and artistic pursuits. But unless we find ways to share the prosperity and help Americans adapt to the coming changes, many could be left worse off than they are,” argue Vivek Wadhwa and Edward Alden. 

See more in United States; Trade; Technology and Science