Transnational Crime

Primary Sources

Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime

The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime was adopted in 2000 and entered into force on December 25, 2003.

The UNODC states, "The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children, was adopted by General Assembly resolution 55/25. ... It is the first global legally binding instrument with an agreed definition on trafficking in persons. The intention behind this definition is to facilitate convergence in national approaches with regard to the establishment of domestic criminal offences that would support efficient international cooperation in investigating and prosecuting trafficking in persons cases. An additional objective of the Protocol is to protect and assist the victims of trafficking in persons with full respect for their human rights."

See more in Global; Transnational Crime; Human Trafficking

Transcript

Session Three of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?

Speaker: Adam Isacson

Session Three of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat? Subject: Regional and Multilateral Policy Responses. Held at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York.

See more in Drug Trafficking and Control; Latin America and the Caribbean; Transnational Crime

Transcript

Session Two of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?

Speakers: Ramon Garza Barrios and Rodrigo Pardo
Presider: Andrew D. Selee

Session Two of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat? Subject: Local and National Policy Responses. Held at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York.

See more in Drug Trafficking and Control; Latin America and the Caribbean; Transnational Crime

Transcript

Session One of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?

Speakers: David Holiday, William F. Wechsler, and Lee S. Wolosky
Introductory Speaker: James M. Lindsay
Presider: Stanley S. Arkin

Session One of a Council on Foreign Relations Symposium on Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat? Subject: Organized Crime and Transnational Threats. Held at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York.

See more in Drug Trafficking and Control; Latin America and the Caribbean; Transnational Crime

Video

Organized Crime and Transnational Threats

Speakers: David Holiday, William F. Wechsler, and Lee S. Wolosky
Introductory Speaker: James M. Lindsay
Presider: Stanley S. Arkin

Watch experts discuss organized crime including the circumstances under which criminal activities constitute a threat to national security.

This session was part of the CFR symposium, Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?, undertaken in collaboration with the Latin American Program and Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and made possible by the generous support of the Hauser Foundation, Tinker Foundation, and a grant from the Robina Foundation for CFR's International Institutions and Global Governance program.

See more in Global; Transnational Crime

Video

Local and National Policy Responses to Organized Crime

Speakers: Ramon Garza Barrios and Rodrigo Pardo García-Peña
Presider: Andrew D. Selee

Watch the mayor of Nuevo Laredo and the former Colombian foreign minister discuss steps Mexico and Colombia are taking to control organized crime in their countries.

This session was part of the CFR symposium, Organized Crime in the Western Hemisphere: An Overlooked Threat?, undertaken in collaboration with the Latin American Program and Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and made possible by the generous support of the Hauser Foundation, Tinker Foundation, and a grant from the Robina Foundation for CFR's International Institutions and Global Governance program.

See more in United States; Transnational Crime