Treaties and Agreements

Video

Countdown to Copenhagen Symposium: Session 3: U.S. Options for Copenhagen

Speakers: Michael A. Levi, Frank E. Loy, and Daniel M. Price
Presider: Juliet Eilperin

Watch experts outline some of the options the United States negotiating team could pursue during climate change talks at Copenhagen.

This session was part of a CFR symposium, Countdown to Copenhagen: What's Next for Climate Change?, which was made possible through generous support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Alcoa Foundation, and the Robina Foundation.

See more in Climate Change; Treaties and Agreements; United States

Council Special Report No. 46

The National Interest and the Law of the Sea

Author: Scott G. Borgerson

Seaborne commerce remains the linchpin of the global economy. And beyond trade, a host of other issues, ranging from climate change and energy to defense and piracy, ensure that the oceans will hold considerable strategic interest well into the future. In this report, Scott G. Borgerson explores an important element of the maritime policy regime: the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. He examines the international negotiations that led to the convention, the history of debates in the United States over whether to join it, and the strategic importance of the oceans for U.S. foreign policy today.

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Primary Sources

Treaty of Lisbon

The Treaty of Lisbon amended the EU's two core treaties, the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty establishing the European Community. It was signed on December 13, 2007 and entered into force on December 1, 2009.

See more in Treaties and Agreements; EU

Primary Sources

Executive Order 13440: Interpretation of the Geneva Conventions Common Article 3 as Applied to a Program of Detention and Interrogation Operated by the Central Intelligence Agency

Author: George W. Bush

President George Bush gave this order on July 20, 2007, which states that members of terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda and the Taliban "are unlawful enemy combatants who are not entitled to the protections that the Third Geneva Convention provides to prisoners of war." This order was revoked in 2009 by Executive Order 13491, which reaffirms U.S. commitments to international treaties related to the treatment of detainees.

See more in United States; Terrorism and the Law; Treaties and Agreements