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The Atlantic: The New Terrorist Training Ground

Author: Yochi Dreazen
September 18, 2013

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"In the summer of last year, an al‑Qaeda affiliate known as AQIM, for "al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb," took over Gao and made it the capital of the rump state the group created after forcing the Malian army out of the north."

Gao, the largest city in northern Mali, is a place of extremes. It's a sprawl of one- and two-story mud-brick houses that lack power lines and running water, but it's also home to the garish, McMansion-style estates of Cocainebougou, or "Cocaine Town," a deserted neighborhood that once belonged to Arab drug lords who controlled the region's smuggling routes for hashish and cocaine but fled, fearing reprisals from local citizens who blamed them for the Islamist invasion. The city has few high schools and no universities, but many of Mali's leading guitarists and percussionists learned their craft in Gao's decades-old youth orchestras; it is a proudly secular city that also houses the Tomb of Askia, one of the oldest mosques in Africa, built in the 15th century to honor a regional ruler.

Gao was for centuries best known as the capital of the ancient Songhai Empire, which once controlled a region larger than present-day Mali. In the summer of last year, an al‑Qaeda affiliate known as AQIM, for "al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb," took over Gao and made it the capital of the rump state the group created after forcing the Malian army out of the north. Months earlier, the Tuareg, a separatist minority long bent on independence, had laid the groundwork for AQIM and its Islamist allies when they captured the city. When I visited northern Mali in March of this year, a black-metal billboard the extremists had erected on the main road leading into the city was still welcoming visitors to the "Islamic City of Gao."


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