The Struggle Within: What Pakistan's Unrest Could Mean for the United States

Speaker:
Zahid Hussain Pakistan Correspondent, Times of London, Wall Street Journal, and Newsweek; Author, Frontline Pakistan: The Struggle with Militant Islam
Presider:
Daniel S. Markey Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations
Description

Tensions within Pakistan are on the rise. Lawyers have taken to the streets to protest President Pervez Musharraf’s decision to remove the Supreme Court chief justice. Many in the country are wondering if these protests are emblematic of a larger problem: a perceived crackdown on democratic institutions. Meanwhile President Musharraf works to maintain control over a country increasingly divided by violent radical Islamists while allying himself with the United States in the global war on terror. Can he work with the very elements the United States urges him to go after?

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