Roundtable Series on Global Islamic Politics

Director: Vali R. Nasr, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies
October 2007 - Present

The challenges facing the Muslim world occupy the forefront of U.S. foreign policy. The roundtable series on Global Islamic Politics facilitates discussion and debate on key issues that will shape the direction of politics in the Muslim world in the coming years and their ensuing impact on U.S. foreign policy. Roundtables are held in both New York and Washington, DC, ensuring a wide mix of participants working in policymaking, government, business, media, and academia. Sessions will address the implications of the changing balance of power in the Middle East, the future of radical Islam in Europe, as well as Hezbollah and Iran.

Meetings

Roundtable Meeting

How the Intelligence Community Understood the Islamic Challenge

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

Iran's Economic Performance and What it Means for its Politics

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

Hezbollah Since the 2006 War: Where is the Organization Heading?

This meeting is not for attribution.

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Roundtable Meeting

Where Are We with Al-Qaeda? A Progress Report After the Mumbai Attacks

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

The Implications of the Taliban Surge and the Rise of Extremism in Pakistan

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

What Iranians Think: The Attitudes and Political Views of the Revolution's Second Generation

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

Dubai and the Emerging Economics of the Persian Gulf: Prospects and Threats

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

The Growing Crises in Afghanistan and Pakistan: New Challenges for U.S. Policy

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

Hezbollah and Iran

This meeting is not for attribution.

Roundtable Meeting

The Implications of the Changing Balance of Power in the Middle East

This meeting is not for attribution.