Women and Foreign Policy Program

The Women and Foreign Policy program is a major component of CFR's Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy initiative. The objective of the Women and Foreign Policy program is to bring the status of women firmly into the mainstream foreign policy debate. Thanks in part to its efforts, there is now broad understanding of the importance of women's empowerment to a host of development, health, security, and other global priorities.

The program's current areas of focus include:

  • Improving maternal health in Afghanistan.
  • U.S. leadership in international reproductive health and family planning.
  • The role of technology and private sector resources in empowering women economically.
  • Entrepreneurs and market linkages in conflict and post-conflict environments.

Please see below for relevant publications:

A Peace Penalty for Afghan Women?

As the United States backs reconciliation talks with the Taliban, many Afghan women fear a rollback of their rights. The international community must ensure that discussions of Afghanistan's future include its women, says CFR's Gayle Lemmon.

See more in Women; Afghanistan

Teaching Module: Paradise Beneath Her Feet

Teaching Module: Paradise Beneath Her Feet

Author: Isobel Coleman

This module features teaching notes by CFR Senior Fellow Isobel Coleman, author of Paradise Beneath Her Feet: How Women Are Transforming the Middle East, along with other resources to supplement the text. Dr. Coleman demonstrates how influential Islamic feminist thinkers are driving social change in the Middle East to create economic, political, and educational opportunities for women.

See more in Women; Middle East and North Africa

Evaluating Progress on the UN Millennium Development Goals (Audio)

Speakers: T. Charles Cooper, Robert C. Orr, and Samuel A. Worthington
Presider: Gail D. Fosler

Experts discuss the role of the UN Millennium Development Goals as a framework for new government development policy, the importance of increasing aid funding transparency with developing nations, and the impact of the financial crisis on the developing world.

See more in Economic Development; Foreign Aid