All CFR Reports

Freedom, Prosperity, and Security

Freedom, Prosperity, and Security

Africa, mired in poverty, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and armed conflict, has rightfully occupied a prominent place in the G8’s agenda over the past several years. This report, written in anticipation of the G8’s June 2004 summit at Sea Island, Georgia, highlights the need for the G8 to maintain a strong partnership with Africa, even as the world’s attention turns increasingly to the Middle East.

See more in Africa (sub-Saharan); Politics and Strategy

Addressing the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

Addressing the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

Author: Princeton N. Lyman

The Bush administration’s $15 billion AIDS initiative has received much attention for its boldness and size. But, according to this indispensable Council Special Report, it will not succeed unless it is folded into a broader and longer-term commitment to developing basic health systems in affected countries. To successfully battle AIDS--one of the most pressing threats known to mankind--the effort must also go beyond health to address social and economic factors that drive the spread of the disease.

See more in United States; Diseases, Infectious; Health Policy and Initiatives

Challenges for a Post-Election Philippines

Challenges for a Post-Election Philippines

Author: Catherine E. Dalpino

As a victim of terrorism and the strongest supporter of U.S. counterterrorism policy among the members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the Philippines already plays a vital role in preserving American security. With anti-Americanism on the rise in South Korea and Japan, the United States may need to depend more on the Philippines to fulfill its objectives in Asia. This report assesses the political, economic, and strategic situation in the Philippines following the 2004 elections and recommends steps that the United States and the Philippines should take to strengthen their economic and military ties.

See more in Philippines; Defense and Security; Elections

Stability, Security and Sovereignty in the Republic of Georgia

Stability, Security and Sovereignty in the Republic of Georgia

Author: David L. Phillips

Georgia is strategically important to the United States in the war on terror and an indispensable transit point for energy supplies between Asia and Europe. Though the country’s November 2003 “revolution of roses” is the most positive event to have occurred in the countries of the former Soviet Union in more than a decade, Georgia is entering an unstable period of transition as its new government tries to promote national coherence among the country’s ethnic groups and takes steps to dismantle the corrupt power structure that thrived under former president Eduard Shevardnadze. This timely report, written by an expert on conflict prevention in the Caucasus, recommends steps the United States and the international community can to take to bolster President Mikhail Saakashvili as well as moves his government should make in the short and long term.

See more in Georgia; Sovereignty

Global Economics Monthly May 2016

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn argues that the crisis in Venezuela continues to escalate, with no recovery or relief in sight. A messy and chaotic default looms, and the rescue will likely involve a tough adjustment program, large-scale financing from international policymakers, and deep sacrifices from Venezuela’s creditors and, most of all, the Venezuelan people. China’s role, as Venezuela’s largest creditor, will be critical and precedential for other emerging market commodity exporters with too much debt.

See more in Americas; Economics

The Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership as a Foreign Policy Tool

The Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership as a Foreign Policy Tool

What are the ways in which the Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership (TTIP) could advance the noneconomic foreign policy interests of the United States, the European Union (EU), and EU member states? The Council on Foreign Relations gathered experts—including current and former policymakers, economists, political scientists, investors, and business representatives—to explore whether and how the still-evolving TTIP could be designed to meet foreign policy objectives.

See more in Europe; Trade; Treaties and Agreements

Global Economics Monthly April 2016

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn argues that the case for strong and effective Group of Twenty (G20) leadership is as compelling as ever. But if the G20 is to be as effective in noncrisis times as it was in 2008–2009, it needs stronger Chinese leadership, working informally yet closely with the United States—a Group of Two (G2) within the G20. Debt policy is one area where China and the United States should cooperate this year.

See more in Global; Economics

Anticipating and Avoiding Global Food Price Crises

Anticipating and Avoiding Global Food Price Crises

Volatile food prices have become a frequent feature of the global economy. The Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies and the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations convened a score of experts to examine the consequences of past, and future, spikes in global food prices.

See more in Global; Food Security

Global Economics Monthly March 2016

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn argues that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) deserves credit for effectively responding to the global and European financial crises. However, the institution will face different and potentially more difficult challenges in the next five years as it struggles to come to terms with a changing international power order and lending rules that are not well suited to address future crises.

See more in Global; Economics

Economic and Geopolitical Fallout From China’s Slowing Growth

Economic and Geopolitical Fallout From China’s Slowing Growth

What will China’s economic slowdown mean for the globe? The Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies and the Asia Studies program at the Council on Foreign Relations convened a group of experts in economics, finance, government, political science, and military affairs to find out.

See more in China; Economics

Protecting Data Privacy With User-Friendly Software

Protecting Data Privacy With User-Friendly Software

Author: Sara "Scout" Sinclair Brody

Protecting the privacy of user data from unauthorized access is essential for business executives, policymakers, and users themselves. But strong privacy protection software is often difficult for nonexperts to use. In this Cyber Brief, Sara "Scout" Sinclair Brody explains how promoting and improving open-source software can go a long way toward strengthening privacy online.

See more in Global; Cybersecurity; Privacy

Global Economics Monthly February 2016

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn argues that the idea of capital control is less radical than it seems; although comprehensive liberalization is theoretically the ideal option, capital controls may be China’s best chance to end the panic roiling global markets.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Economics

Keeping the Edge: U.S. Innovation

Keeping the Edge: U.S. Innovation

Authors: Edward Alden and Rebecca Strauss

The United States leads the world in combining innovation quality and quantity, but the challenges are growing, particularly when it comes to scientific research. Addressing gaps in U.S. innovation policy could help ensure that the United States remains the leading innovation center for decades to come. 

See more in United States; Innovation; Competitiveness

No Helping Hand: Federal Worker-Retraining Policy

No Helping Hand: Federal Worker-Retraining Policy

Authors: Edward Alden and Rebecca Strauss

A decade ago the United States had the lowest share of long-term unemployed workers among developed nations. But today U.S. long-term unemployment levels are nearly as high as those in Europe, despite stronger overall U.S. economic performance. This Progress Report and Scorecard demonstrates that U.S. federal employment and training programs that assist job seekers do little to help the long-term unemployed prepare for different careers.

See more in United States; Labor; Education

Standard Deductions: U.S. Corporate Tax Policy

Standard Deductions: U.S. Corporate Tax Policy

Authors: Edward Alden and Rebecca Strauss

The U.S. system for taxing corporate profits is outdated, ineffective at raising revenue, and creates perverse incentives for companies to shelter profits overseas. It is also, for most U.S. companies most of the time, a pretty good deal, which is one of the big reasons why any serious overhaul will be so difficult to achieve.

See more in United States; Tax Policy

Quality Control: Federal Regulation Policy

Quality Control: Federal Regulation Policy

Authors: Edward Alden and Rebecca Strauss

The United States used to be the trailblazer in regulatory reform. But the rest of the rich world has caught up. This Progress Report and Scorecard from the Renewing America initiative outlines the current state of federal regulation in the United States and charts ways the U.S. regulatory management system could be improved.

See more in United States; Corporate Regulation