Books

Foreign policy analyses written by CFR fellows and published by trade presses, academic presses, or the Council on Foreign Relations Press.

Hidden Iran

Author: Ray Takeyh

A groundbreaking book that reveals how the underappreciated domestic political rivalries within Iran serve to explain the country's behavior on the world stage. A leading expert explains why we fail to understand Iran and offers a new strategy for redefining this crucial relationship.

See more in Diplomacy and Statecraft; Iraq; Weapons of Mass Destruction; Iran

Continuing the Inquiry

Author: Peter Grose

Direct heir to the academic think tank called "The Inquiry" that prepared Woodrow Wilson for the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, the Council on Foreign Relations has filled a unique and sometimes controversial place in America's history.

See more in History and Theory of International Relations

America Unbound

Authors: James M. Lindsay and Ivo H. Daalder

America Unbound argues that President Bush has redefined how America engages the world, shedding the constraints that friends, allies, and international institutions have traditionally imposed on its freedom, insisting that an America unbound is a more secure America.

See more in United States; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Protecting Democracy

Protecting Democracy examines how democratic states may be able to protect themselves and secure more effective international action against threats such as coups d'etat and the erosion of democratic freedoms and institutions.

See more in Democratization

Globalization: What’s New?

Edited by former Council Senior Fellow and former Maurice R. Greenberg Geoeconomics Center Director Michael Weinstein, and with original contributions from ten eminent economists, Globalization: What's New? cuts through the confusion and rhetoric surrounding globalization to offer straightforward, incisive analyses of the subject and its future.

See more in Global; Globalization

Understanding the War on Terror (Foreign Affairs Books)

On the morning of September 11, 2001, the United States awoke to find itself at war. If that much was clear, many other things were not—including the identity and nature of the enemy, the location of the battleground, and the strategy and tactics necessary for victory.

See more in Terrorism

The Democracy Advantage

Authors: Morton H. Halperin, Michael M. Weinstein, and Joe Siegle

For decades, policies pursued by the United States and other industrialized nations toward the developing world have been based on a secret kept among policy experts: democracy and development don't mix. Turning this long-held view on its head, The Democracy Advantage makes a bold case that they do.

See more in Global; Economic Development; Democratization

Bailouts or Bail-ins?

Authors: Brad W. Setser and Nouriel Roubini

In Bailouts or Bail-Ins, New York University's Nouriel Roubini and former Council International Affairs Fellow Brad Setser argue that the tools needed to respond to a wide range of crises already exist, and the core challenge facing the G7 and the IMF is to do a better job of matching existing tools to different types of crises.

See more in Global; Financial Crises; International Finance

International Economic and Financial Cooperation

Authors: Peter B. Kenen, Jeffrey R. Shafer, Nigel Wicks, and Charles Wyplosz

Written by a group that combines extensive practical experience and analytical sharpness, the sixth title in the Geneva Reports on the World Economy series presents an overview of how cooperation has evolved, identifies its current limitations, and advances a number of proposals.

See more in International Organizations and Alliances; International Finance; Global

America the Vulnerable

Author: Stephen E. Flynn

Three years after September 11, the United States is still dangerously unprepared to prevent or respond to another attack on its soil. Faced with this threat, the United States should be operating on a wartime footing at home. But despite the many new security precautions that have been proposed, America's most serious vulnerabilities remain ominously exposed.

See more in United States; Homeland Security; Preparedness