Articles

Academic articles by CFR fellows and experts.

NCDs and an Outcome-Based Approach to Global Health

Authors: Thomas J. Bollyky, Ezekiel Emanuel, Eric Goosby, David Satcher, Donna E. Shalala, and Tommy Thompson
The Lancet

Once thought to challenge only affluent countries, cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are now the leading cause of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. International efforts should focus on specific NCDs and risk factors that are prevalent in poor working-age (younger than 60 years) people in low-income and middle-income countries, and for which there are low-cost interventions that can be integrated with existing global health platforms.

See more in Global; Health

Quantifying the Effects of Homophobia

Author: Dominic Bocci
The Advocate
Recent academic studies are using new sources and methodologies to push past moral arguments about homosexuality to show that forms of structural stigma — antigay cultural norms and laws that target sexual minorities — may have widespread, systemic effects on society that aren't always apparent at first glance. These studies show that homophobia may significantly stunt economic growth, and may even be harmful to your health.

See more in Global; Human Rights

Waste of Space

Author: Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

Orbit space debris threatens U.S. space assets and assured access to the domain. Micah Zenko argues that the United States has a unique obligation to prevent or mitigate the consequences of dangerous space incidents, which are the primary cause of space debris, because it relies heavily on space and has unmatched space situational awareness.

See more in United States; Space

Securing Sovereignty: When Should America Weigh In?

Author: Mira Rapp-Hooper
The National Interest

In mid-February, the United States government's long-standing position that it does not opine on sovereignty disputes in the East and South China Seas was given an important and long-implicit caveat: Washington does insist that all sovereignty claims accord with international law, and as has long been stated, these cannot rely on coercion.

See more in United States; Treaties and Agreements; Military Operations

The Power to Threaten War

Author: Matthew C. Waxman
Yale Law Journal Online

Matt Waxman shows that congressional influence operates more robustly—and in different ways—than usually supposed in legal debates about war powers to shape strategic decision-making. In turn, these mechanisms of congressional influence can enhance the potency of threatened force.

See more in United States; Wars and Warfare

Planning for Withdrawal in Afghanistan May Be Smart, But It’s Not Wise

Author: Daniel S. Markey
Defense One

Votes are still being counted in Afghanistan's presidential election, but preliminary results suggest that no candidate won a majority. If these results hold up and no backroom deals are cooked up between Afghan politicians, a runoff poll will follow and the victor will not likely be declared until late summer. That timeline is making U.S. and NATO military planners very nervous.

See more in Afghanistan; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Defense Strategy

The Keys to the Foreign-Policy Kingdom

Author: Micah Zenko
Foreign Policy

In the U.S. foreign policy and national security communities there is a severe underrepresentation of women, as well as minorities, non-Americans, younger analysts and scholars, and others, due in large part to the gatekeepers of institutions and media, argues Micah Zenko. He provides four factors to keep in mind when determining the causes of and identifying solutions to this problem.

See more in Global; Ethnicity, Minorities, and National Identity

Don’t Chop the Air Force – Look to the Reserves

Authors: Janine Davidson and Margaret Harrell
The Hill

Drawing on her experience as a member of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, Janine Davidson argues that deep cuts to active Air Force personnel without commensurate increases in reserve unit capacity will result in the loss of valuable training investment and institutional knowledge.

See more in United States; Defense Budget