Academic articles by CFR fellows and experts.

Obama’s ‘Atrocity Prevention Board’ — Abandoned, but Not Forgotten

Author: Elliott Abrams
National Review

In April 2012, Barack Obama went to the Holocaust Museum to declare, in solemn tones, that the lessons of the Holocaust and other episodes of genocide must be learned — and under his leadership American would learn them. Never again! he said. And he called that day for establishing a new government body called the Atrocity Prevention Board.

See more in United States; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Leaning From Behind

Authors: Micah Zenko and Amelia Wolf
Foreign Policy

There is a troubling lack of women in the world of foreign-policy making. Micah Zenko and Amelia M. Wolf discuss the consequences of inherent biases against women’s empowerment in the government, think-tanks, and media, and what can be done to combat those biases.

See more in United States; Women; Politics and Strategy

China-Korea Relations:Prospects for a Strategic Partnership?

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and See-won Byun
Comparative Connections

Scott Snyder and See-won Byun write that President Park Geun-hye's participation in China's seventieth anniversary celebrations of the end of World War II in September affirmed Seoul's ties with Beijing. The escalation of inter-Korean tensions in late August, however, revealed the dilemmas underlying Seoul's regional diplomacy that continue to undermine coordination on North Korea and other security challenges.

See more in China; South Korea; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Understanding The Relationships Between Noncommunicable Diseases, Unhealthy Lifestyles, And Country Wealth

Authors: Thomas J. Bollyky, Caroline Andridge, and Joseph L. Dieleman

The amount of international aid given to address noncommunicable diseases is minimal. Most of it is directed to wealthier countries and focuses on the prevention of unhealthy lifestyles. Explanations for the current direction of noncommunicable disease aid include that these are diseases of affluence that benefit from substantial research and development into their treatment in high-income countries and are better addressed through domestic tax and policy measures to reduce risk-factor prevalence than through aid programs. This study assessed these justifications. First, we examined the relationships among premature adult mortality, defined as the probability that a person who has lived to the age of fifteen will die before the age of sixty from noncommunicable diseases; the major risk factors for these diseases; and country wealth. Second, we compared noncommunicable and communicable diseases prevalent in poor and wealthy countries alike, and their respective links to economic development. Last, we examined the respective roles that wealth and risk prevention have played in countries that achieved substantial reductions in premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases. Our results support greater investment in cost-effective noncommunicable disease preventive care and treatment in poorer countries and a higher priority for reducing key risk factors, particularly tobacco use.

See more in Global; Health

A Role for the World Trade Organization on Regulatory Coherence

Author: Thomas J. Bollyky
The E15 Initiative

The way the world trades has changed since the World Trade Organization (WTO) was established. Fewer goods and services originate from any one supplier or country. Components and intermediate services are increasingly sourced and assembled from specialist suppliers around the world. Regulation also plays a more significant role in this era of international trade. The adequacy of regulatory oversight has become more important as complex, unbundled global supply chains have become harder for businesses and customers to monitor.

See more in Global; Global Governance

The Ally That Wasn't

Author: Elliott Abrams

In a review for Commentary, Elliott Abrams analyzes Ambassador Michael Oren’s new book Ally. Abrams notes that while Ambassador Oren frankly describes the various actions by President Obama that worsened relations between the U.S. and Israel, he is not candid about the supporters who defended Obama as he went down that path.

See more in United States; Israel; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Plots, Suspects, and Repercussions of the Bombing at Bangkok’s Erawan Shrine

Author: Joshua Kurlantzick
The National

Almost two weeks after the bombing at central Bangkok’s Erawan Shrine that killed 20 people and set off a massive manhunt for a suspect identified in CCTV video, Thai authorities appear no closer to solving the case. No one has taken credit for the attack and Thai leaders have also denied the bombing had anything to do with international terrorism, although they provided no evidence to support this claim.

See more in Thailand; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

The New 'Two Chinas' Question

Author: Richard N. Haass
Project Syndicate

Today there is an emerging two China question centering on the future of the country and whether China is best understood as a strong country, one with a promising future despite some short-term difficulties, or whether China’s troubles are structural, with the result that it is in real trouble and its future in some doubt. In short, two very different Chinas. 

See more in China; Development; Economics