Must Reads

A sortable index of the best online analyses and inquiries on foreign policy.

Economist: A Peace Process That is Going Nowhere

"The only way this bleak prognosis could change is if Mr Netanyahu himself were to 'do a Sharon'—that is, to defy his own Likud party, forge a new outfit, reshape his coalition, and—in an expression that often comes up in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv—'cross the Rubicon' on the way to two states."

See more in Israel; Politics and Strategy

Economist: Beneath the Glacier

"The organisations could be a way for the Communist Party to co-opt the energy and resources of civil society. They could also be a means by which that energy challenges the party's power. And so their status has big implications."

See more in China; Politics and Strategy

Breaking Views: Greece Unbound

Author: Hugo Dixon

"The reopening of the markets to Greece also means it probably no longer faces a funding gap, which the last official projections by its creditors put at 15 billion euros over the next two years."

See more in Europe; Emerging Markets

NYT: During Hagel Visit, China Showed Its Military Might, and Its Frustrations

Author: Helene Cooper

"The displays of China's military power reveal some dividends from years of heavy investments, and perhaps a sense that China is now more willing to stand toe-to-toe with the Americans, at least on regional security issues. But American officials and Asia experts say the visits also showed a more insecure side of China's military leadership — a tendency to display might before they are ready to deploy it, and a lingering uncertainty about how assertively to defend its territorial claims in the region."

See more in China; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Policy: ‘They Just Stood Watching’

Author: Colum Lynch

"Darfur's combatants, particularly the Sudanese government, have effectively neutered the U.N. peacekeeping mission, undermining its capacity to fulfill its primary duty to protect nearly 2 million civilians displaced by Sudan's genocide. During the past year alone, more than 500,000 terrified men, women, and children have poured into the region's already overcrowded refugee camps."

See more in Sudan; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

The Diplomat: U.S.-Japan Relations: Not So Sweet Caroline

Author: Yo-jung Chen

"America, which badly needs stability in East Asia and a solid U.S.-Japan-South Korea alliance in order to face an assertive—but indispensible—China and an unpredictable North Korea, has been disturbed by the worsening tensions between Japan and its two neighbors under Abe's watch. Although Japan may not be the only party to blame in these quarrels, Washington is increasingly irritated by what it sees as Abe's unhelpful flexing of nationalism that has served only to aggravate an already precarious situation in Asia."

See more in Japan; Politics and Strategy

WSJ: How a Giant Kazakh Oil Project Went Awry

Authors: Selina Williams, Geraldine Amiel, and Justin Scheck

"To replace what they pump, oil companies need to collaborate with state-owned companies that control 90% of the globe's remaining oil reserves, by a World Bank estimate. But governments often give foreign oil companies access only to the hardest-to-develop acreage. Kashagan's large-scale stumble shows how collaborations in these difficult fields can go sour for both sides."

See more in Kazakhstan; Oil

NYT: The Wolf Hunters of Wall Street

Author: Michael Lewis

"Katsuyama and his team did measure how much more cheaply they bought stock when they removed the ability of some other unknown trader to front-run them. For instance, they bought 10 million shares of Citigroup, then trading at roughly $4 per share, and saved $29,000 — or less than 0.1 percent of the total price… It sounded small until you realized that the average daily volume in the U.S. stock market was $225 billion. The same tax rate applied to that sum came to nearly $160 million a day."

See more in North America; Banks and Banking

Economist: Holding Back Half the Nation

"By 2020 Mr Abe wants women to occupy 30% of all "leadership" positions—which would include members of parliament, heads of local government and corporate executives. His most practical step has been to try to shorten waiting lists for child care by allowing more private companies into a previously state-dominated sector."

See more in Japan; Development

Think Progress: U.S. Stepping Up Campaign Against Joseph Kony, Highlighting Complex Relationship With Uganda

Author: Hayes Brown

"Five months into his first term in office, President Barack Obama laid out his vision for how American values would guide his thinking in crafting foreign policy. 'We uphold our most cherished values not only because doing so is right, but because it strengthens our country and it keeps us safe,' he said at the time…. The next five years have shown the difficulty that comes when some of those values clash with each other, jostling for dominance."

See more in Uganda; Politics and Strategy