Must Reads

A sortable index of the best online analyses and inquiries on foreign policy.

Amnesty International: "Treat Us Like We Are Human": Migrant Workers in Qatar

"Migrant workers in Qatar face a range of abuses at the hands of their employers. In some of the cases investigated by Amnesty International, these abuses amount to forced labour and human trafficking. Some arrive to find that the nature of the work, their salaries, hours of work or conditions are very different to those they had been promised. Many migrant workers find their employers delay their pay or stop paying them at all."

See more in Qatar; Human Rights

NYT: Samsung: Uneasy in the Lead

Authors: Eric Pfanner and Brian X. Chen

"Samsung's sales are equal to about one-quarter of South Korea's economic output. Samsung Electronics, the flagship, posted $190 billion in sales last year—about the same sales as Microsoft, Google, Amazon and Facebook combined."

See more in South Korea; Technology and Science

FP: Will India's Next Leader Be Banned from America?

Author: John Hudson

"Pollsters say the BJP is now widely expected to win next year's general election, which would make the party's controversial prime ministerial nominee, Narendra Modi, the next leader of India. The State Department won't say whether a Prime Minister Modi would be allowed entrance to the United States, but experts say the question looms large over the U.S.-India relationship."

See more in India; Politics and Strategy

New Yorker: State of Deception

Author: Ryan Lizza

"[Keeping the phone metadata collection program] was the first in a series of decisions by Obama to institutionalize some of the most controversial national-security policies of the Bush Administration. Faced with a long list of policies to roll back…reining in the N.S.A.'s surveillance programs might have seemed like a low priority. As core members of Al Qaeda were killed, the danger shifted to terrorists who were less organized and more difficult to detect, making the use of the N.S.A.'s powerful surveillance tools even more seductive."

See more in United States; Intelligence

The Diplomat: U.S.-Japan Alliance Sparks Korean Grand Strategy Debate

Author: Robert E. Kelly

"To join a U.S.-Japanese anti-Chinese coalition would not only antagonize China, it would align Korea with its "ancient foe." Worse, the mutual U.S. alliances mean that nationalists and maximalists in Korea and Japan can make whatever outrageous claims they like about the other, yet face little geopolitical consequence. U.S. alliances are a form of "moral hazard" that ironically worsen the problem by reducing the incentives for rapprochement."

See more in Asia and Pacific; Defense and Security

FP: The Kerry Doctrine

Author: Douglas G. Brinkley

"This boldness is at the heart of the Kerry Doctrine, which involves tackling the issues most likely to make a historic difference -- that is, the world's most festering problems -- and doing so with direct, don't-sweat-the-small-stuff diplomacy. It rests on leveraging long-term, substantive relationships with fellow politicians around the world in order to employ diplomatic intervention as the first choice, not the last resort."

See more in Global; Politics and Strategy

AP: A Reporter's Quest to Find Bodies in Mali

Author: Rukmini Callimachi

Close to three dozen people in northern Mali disappeared earlier this year, killed or taken away by the country's military. The victims were caught in a backlash against Arabs and Tuaregs.

See more in Mali; Human Rights

FT: The Scandal at the Vatican Bank

Author: Rachel Sanderson

"After a decade of paedophilia scandals, the allegations of financial impropriety seemed set to unleash another storm of criticism and had to be addressed. Outside auditors as well as financial risk consultants were already coming into the Vatican but the arrest of Scarano made the case for reform unavoidable. "We cannot have any more scandal. It is so shameful," a senior member of the Vatican's financial administration said."

See more in Holy See/Vatican; Banks and Banking

Carnegie: Egypt’s Draft Constitution Rewards the Military and Judiciary

Authors: Nathan J. Brown and Michele Dunne

"Egyptian voters might well be asked to approve the new constitution without knowing much about when their new president and parliament will be elected or what sort of system will govern the parliament. They may not know whether the defense minister who ousted Morsi will run for president or whether a malleable civilian will be put forward for the job. They may not even know whether the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party will be dissolved and therefore banned from running for seats in parliament. All these are salient points, because the vote in January will be more a popular referendum on the July 2013 coup than one on the draft constitution itself, which few are likely to read."

See more in Egypt; Politics and Strategy

Rolling Stone: Snowden and Greenwald: The Men Who Leaked the Secrets

Author: Janet Reitman

"Snowden grew up in the shadow of the biggest intelligence-gathering organization in the world – the National Security Agency – in the Anne Arundel County community of Crofton, Maryland. A solidly middle-class, planned community of 27,000 that Money has ranked as one of the '100 Best Places to Live,' Crofton, like the towns around it, fed the workforce of the defense and intelligence contractors in the area. The NSA, which employs tens of thousands of people in the public and private sectors, was just 15 miles away, at Fort Meade, whose high school boasts a 'homeland-security program' to funnel kids into the industry."

See more in United States; Defense and Security

Project Syndicate: An Agenda to Save the Euro

Author: Joseph E. Stiglitz

"If the eurozone adopts the program outlined above, there should be no need for Germany to pick up any tab. But under the perverse policies that Europe has adopted, one debt restructuring has been followed by another. If Germany and the other northern European countries continue to insist on pursuing current policies, they, together with their southern neighbors, will wind up paying a high price."

See more in Europe; Financial Crises

New Yorker: Pakistan’s Next Top General

Author: Omar Waraich

"All of these steps are meant to ensure that the prime minister, and not the Army chief, is the most powerful Sharif in Pakistan. But that status is not easy to guarantee: before he was toppled by Musharraf, in 1999, Sharif thought that his position was invulnerable, thanks to a landslide victory that gave him an overwhelming majority in Parliament. If the direct threat of a coup has receded, today Sharif faces a broader array of checks on his power."

See more in Pakistan; Politics and Strategy