Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya on How to Replicate India’s Growth in Other Developing Countries, in New CFR Book

Indian leaders and economic planners focused on eradicating poverty by "growing the pie rather than slicing it," and fueled the country's growth with market-based policies, write economists Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya in Why Growth Matters: How Economic Growth in India Reduced Poverty and the Lessons for Other Developing Countries, a new Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) book.

See more in India; Economics; Economic Development

President Obama Should Limit Drone Killings, Argues Micah Zenko in New Report

U.S. drone strike policies undermine the nation's foreign policy objectives and have resulted in the loss of hundreds of innocent civilian lives, according to a report by CFR Douglas Dillon Fellow Micah Zenko from the Center for Preventive Action. Zenko calls for greater oversight of U.S. drone strikes from the Obama administration, Congress, and the international community.

See more in Yemen; Drones; Conflict Prevention

Combating Crime Critical to Securing Central America’s Fragile Democracies, Says CFR Report

"Flanked by the coca-producing countries of the Andes and the world's leading consumer of illegal drugs—the United States—Central America is a strategic choke point for illicit trade," writes Michael Shifter, president of Inter-American Dialogue, in a Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Special Report, Countering Criminal Violence in Central America.

See more in Latin America and the Caribbean; Transnational Crime

No Power Will Dominate the Coming Era, Argues Charles Kupchan in New Book

"Between 1500 and 1800, the West sprinted ahead of other centers of power in Asia and the Middle East. Europe and the United States have dominated the world since," writes Charles A. Kupchan in a new CFR book, No One's World: The West, The Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn. But this era is coming to a close, he argues, as power shifts from the West to the rising rest.

See more in History and Theory of International Relations; Grand Strategy

U.S.-Saudi Relationship Increasingly Strained, says CFR Report

The U.S.-Saudi relationship has become strained by increasing mistrust and misunderstanding—most recently over Egypt and Bahrain—and gone are the old foundations of the informal alliance: the Cold War and U.S. operation of Riyadh's oil fields. This is the judgment of F. Gregory Gause III of the University of Vermont, in Saudi Arabia in the New Middle East. The two countries can no longer expect to act in close concert, and the United States should recast the relationship as transactional, one based on cooperation when interests dictate, he argues.

See more in Saudi Arabia; Politics and Strategy; United States