Op-Eds

Published opinions and arguments by CFR fellows and experts.

Among High-Growth Firms, Reason for Optimism on Startups. (Really.)

Author: Robert E. Litan
Wall Street Journal

Think Tank readers know of my pessimism about the 30-year secular decline in the startup rate–the ratio of new U.S. firms with at least one employee as a share of all firms–through 2011. Labor Department data out Wednesday that looked at new firms and jobs created in the last quarter of 2015 showed how the numbers are down since the recession ended compared with pre-recession data.

See more in United States; Financial Markets

The Wisdom of The Hague’s South China Sea Decision

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
Wall Street Journal

Jerome A. Cohen discusses the verdict in the Philippines’ case against China in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

In this op-ed, Cohen writes about the importance of the decision both in drawing greater attention to the role of arbitration in international relations and in ruling that none of the Spratlys are entitled to an exclusive economic zone. 

See more in Asia and Pacific; Politics and Strategy

U.S. Needs New South China Sea Strategy To Contain Beijing

Author: Jennifer M. Harris
Newsweek

On Tuesday, the United Nations Permanent Court of Arbitration issued its final ruling in a landmark case between the Philippines and China over disputed maritime claims in the South China Sea. The object of intense global interest, the three-year-old case has come to serve as a bellwether for the kind of rising power China intends to be.

See more in China; United States; Regional Security

What Comes Next After Raqqa and Mosul?

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Defense One

As U.S.-backed rebels fight to liberate Raqqa and Mosul, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon questions next steps for these cities. “Will these disparate forces stay together to form a federation of at least relative order that allows people to go to work and send their children to school?,” asks Lemmon. “Who will do the governing? Under what authority? And what comes next if that doesn’t happen?”

See more in Iraq; Syria; Military Operations; Conflict Assessment

How Little Do U.S. Allies in NATO Spend on Defense?

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

When President Barack Obama sits down with the leaders of allied governments in Warsaw on Friday, there will be much talk of the revitalization of NATO. Much of it will even be justified: The alliance is making its security guarantees more meaningful by deploying more troops with better equipment to front-line Eastern European states.

See more in United States; Defense Budget; International Organizations and Alliances

New International Energy Forum Focuses on Innovation

Authors: Varun Sivaram and Graham Pugh
The Hill

Last month, energy ministers from around the world gathered in San Francisco for the annual Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM), which for the past seven years has focused on deploying existing clean energy technologies around the world. But for the first time, clean energy innovation was on the gathering’s agenda as well. In a parallel “Mission Innovation” Ministerial (MIM), twenty countries and the European Union — accounting for over 80 percent of the world’s public energy research and development (R&D) funding — committed to collectively double R&D funding to $30 billion by 2021.

See more in Global; Energy Policy; Climate Change

Turkey’s in a Terrible Spot

Author: Steven A. Cook
Slate

Security in Turkey has deteriorated in recent years as the country’s leadership seeks to influence conflicts around its borders, argues CFR’s Steven A. Cook. Turkish policies toward Syria, the Kurds, Iraq, and the fight against the self-declared Islamic State has contributed to the rise of terrorism in Turkey, including the attack on the Istanbul airport.

 

See more in Turkey; Politics and Strategy