Op-Eds

Published opinions and arguments by CFR fellows and experts.

Congress Shouldn't Cut Military Research on Climate Change

Author: Varun Sivaram
The Hill

The new House budget sets a deadline of October 1 to “cut waste, eliminate redundancies and end the abuse or misuse of taxpayer dollars,” and it specifically targets the Department of Defense (DOD) for spending “part of their budget studying climate change.” Varun Sivaram highlights how the military’s broad portfolio of climate change adaptation efforts should not be considered redundant or wasteful because it bolsters American national security interests.

See more in United States; Climate Change; Budget, Debt, and Deficits

The Iran Time Bomb

Authors: Ray Takeyh, Michael V. Hayden, and Olli Heinonen
Washington Post

As negotiations between Iran and the great powers press forward, Secretary of State John F. Kerry seems to have settled on this defense of any agreement: The terms will leave Iran at least a year away from obtaining a nuclear bomb, thus giving the world plenty of time to react to infractions.

See more in Iran; Treaties and Agreements

Tunisia's Fragile Success Under Attack

Author: Max Boot
Commentary

Tunisia was struck by a terrible act of terrorism today: gunmen, presumably of Islamist persuasion, stormed the Bardo museum in the capital, Tunis, killing tourists indiscriminately. Early news accounts suggest that at least 19 people were killed before security forces stormed the building and killed the terrorists.

See more in Tunisia; Terrorist Attacks

The Austerity Wars: Debunking Paul Krugman

Author: Benn Steil
Forbes Online

Benn Steil’s new Forbes op-ed examines Paul Krugman's data analysis purporting to document definitively that "austerity," defined by declines in real government purchases, damaged growth between 2010 and 2013. He shows that this finding collapses entirely when he excludes countries without independent monetary policies, such as those in the Eurozone. For countries with independent monetary policies, changes in real government purchases had no effect on growth.

See more in Global; Monetary Policy

Is Netanyahu Right About How to Bargain?

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress last week was described here and there as “maximalist”—meaning, he insisted on the best imaginable terms for any agreement with Iran about its nuclear program. Because “Maximalist” is the title of my book on U.S. foreign policy since World War II, people have asked me whether Bibi’s approach isn’t the one the United States used for its own tough negotiations.

See more in Israel; Presidents and Chiefs of State