Other Reports

Various reports from CFR, posted at the discretion of CFR's president and director of studies.

Conflict in the South China Sea

Author: Bonnie S. Glaser

Territorial disputes in the South China Sea continue to be a source of tension and potential conflict between China and other countries in the region. Bonnie S. Glaser argues that the United States should help lower the risk of conflict in the region, including the potential for dangerous military incidents involving U.S. and Chinese military forces.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Conflict Prevention

Promoting Norms for Cyberspace

Author: Henry Farrell

U.S. efforts to promote its preferred norms for cyberspace—Internet openness, security, and free speech—suffered a significant setback in the summer of 2013 with the Snowden disclosures. Henry Farrell identifies three steps the United States can take to reinvigorate its norm-promotion efforts. 

See more in Global; United States; Cybersecurity; Diplomacy and Statecraft

The United States used to be the trailblazer in regulatory reform. But the rest of the rich world has caught up. This Progress Report and Scorecard from the Renewing America initiative outlines the current state of federal regulation in the United States and charts ways the U.S. regulatory management system could be improved.

See more in United States; Corporate Regulation

Global Economics Monthly: March 2015

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn argues that while new collective action clauses are a step forward in dealing with sovereign debt crises, countries must work to change old debt that lacks the clauses to the new standard as quickly as possible.

See more in Global; Economics

Mitigating the Risks of Synthetic Biology

Author: Gigi K. Gronvall

Gigi Kwik Gronvall examines the increased use of synthetic biology—a nascent field that engineers biology to improve manufacturing and the development of medicines—in order to highlight the need for oversight and better regulation.

See more in Global; Health

Nigeria's 2015 Presidential Election

Author: John Campbell

The 2015 elections again may precipitate violence that could destabilize Nigeria, and Washington has even less leverage in Abuja than it did in 2011. CFR Senior Fellow for Africa Policy Studies John Campbell analyzes new concerns about Nigeria's fraught politics.

See more in Nigeria; Elections

A decade ago the United States had the lowest share of long-term unemployed workers among developed nations. But today U.S. long-term unemployment levels are nearly as high as those in Europe, despite stronger overall U.S. economic performance. This Progress Report and Scorecard demonstrates that U.S. federal employment and training programs that assist job seekers do little to help the long-term unemployed prepare for different careers.

See more in United States; Labor; Education

The U.S. Rebalance and the Seoul Process: How to Align U.S. and ROK Visions for Cooperation in East Asia

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and Woo Jung-yeop

Scott Snyder, senior fellow for Korea Studies and director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, and Woo Jung-yeop, research fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies, suggest that Washington should support the Seoul Process under NAPCI and Seoul should support the U.S. rebalance, given the two allies' overlapping goals of promoting cooperation and strengthening respect for international norms in Asia. 

See more in Asia and Pacific; Politics and Strategy

Preventive Priorities Survey: 2015

The Center for Preventive Action's annual Preventive Priorities Survey (PPS) evaluates ongoing and potential conflicts based on their likelihood of occurring in the coming year and their impact on U.S. interests. The PPS aims to help the U.S. policymaking community prioritize competing conflict prevention and mitigation demands.

View the accompanying online interactive: CPA's Global Conflict Tracker

See more in Global; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

Spillovers From Falling Oil Prices: Risks to Mexico and the United States

Authors: Michael A. Levi, Alexandra Mahler-Haug, and Shannon K. O'Neil

U.S. policymakers who worry about the impact of energy developments on geopolitics typically think of high oil prices as bad news and low prices as an unalloyed good. But a sustained drop in oil prices can be dangerous as well. This paper investigates Mexican vulnerability to falling oil prices—and spillovers to the United States—to show how troublesome such a development might be.

See more in Mexico; Oil; Budget, Debt, and Deficits