Primary Sources

Vital primary sources underpinning the foreign policy debate.

Organization of American States: "A Comprehensive Inter-American Cybersecurity Strategy"

On June 10, 2003, the Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly passed a resolution to development a strategy to combat threats to cybersecurity. Built on efforts of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism, Inter-American Telecommunication Commission, and REMJA Governmental Experts Group on Cybercrime, this strategy provides a framework for American states to collaborate in "protecting networks and information systems that constitute the Internet, and for responding to and recovering from incidents."

See more in Americas; Cybersecurity

Nuclear Security Summit Statements

On April 5, 2009, President Obama gave a speech in Prague, calling nuclear terrorism "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security," and hosted the first Nuclear Security Summit (NSS) in Washington, DC in April 2010. Additional summits took place in Seoul in 2012, in the Hague in 2014, and the final session in Washington in 2016. The summit aims to secure nuclear material and encourage collaboration between countries to eliminate nuclear weapons. Additional documents are available on the State Department website. Countries report on their progress in securing their nuclear materials.

See more in Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament; United States; Global

Remarks by U.S. President Obama and Cuban President Castro in a Joint Press Conference

President Barack Obama traveled to Cuba March 20-22, 2016, the first time a sitting U.S. president has traveled to Cuba since 1928. The trip is part of the normalization of relations between the United States and Cuba that began in December 2014. President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro held a joint press conference and discussed the opening of a U.S. embassy in Cuba, trade relations, and human rights.

See more in United States; Cuba; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Human Rights

U.S.-Canada Joint Statement on Climate, Energy, and Arctic Leadership

U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau released this statement on March 10, 2016. The leaders agreed to move forward on the Paris Agreement and support other international efforts to combat the effects of climate change. The joint statement also details U.S.-Canada cooperation on curbing emissions, integrating renewable energy into existing grids, and developing additional clean technologies.

See more in Americas; Arctic; Climate Change; Renewable Energy