Other Reports

Various reports from CFR, posted at the discretion of CFR's president and director of studies.

Author: Thomas Hilliard

There has never been greater urgency for expanding and improving U.S. workforce training programs. In this Working Paper, Thomas Hilliard argues that the federal government should corral the country's siloed and disjointed workforce-development programs in line with a common national strategy.

See more in United States; Labor

Renewing America

Renewing America

Resilient American Values

Authors: Andrew Kohut and Michael Dimock

Despite an extended period of economic difficulty, Pew pollsters Andrew Kohut and Michael Dimock show that Americans' core values and beliefs about economic opportunity remain largely optimistic and unchanged.

See more in United States; Economics; Polls and Opinion Analysis

Renewing America

Renewing America

After Manufacturing

Author: Roland Stephen

North Carolina, which was struck harder by the loss of manufacturing than any other state, offers a realistic guide for communities across the United States with how best to adapt to this new era of growing international competition.

See more in United States; Industrial Policy; Manufacturing

Authors: A. Michael Spence and Sandile Hlatshwayo

Many low-paying jobs have moved from the United States to rapidly growing markets abroad, and higher-paying jobs may soon follow. While Americans benefit from cheaper goods, employment opportunities have diminished. Policymakers should address this trade-off as a first step toward tackling questions of inequality and economic distribution.

See more in Labor; United States; Industrial Policy

Author: Daniel P. Ahn

High and volatile energy prices have driven the regulation of commodity financial markets to the forefront of the U.S. and G20 policy agendas. Integrated commodity markets require international policy coordination, but not all domestic and international policy initiatives are equally desirable.

See more in Economics; Oil; Global

Author: Francis E. Warnock

The dollar's status as the world's reserve currency has become a facet of U.S. power, allowing the United States to borrow effortlessly and sustain an assertive foreign policy. But the capital inflows associated with the dollar's reserve-currency status have created a vulnerability, too, opening the door to a foreign sell-off of U.S. securities that could drive up U.S. interest rates. In this Center for Geoeconomic Studies Capital Flows Quarterly, Francis E. Warnock argues that a sell-off came close to happening in 2009. How the United States uses this reprieve will affect the nation's ability to borrow for years to come, with broad implications for the sustainability of an active U.S. foreign policy.

See more in Financial Crises; Budget, Debt, and Deficits; United States