Foreign Affairs

 

Foreign Affairs

Visit the website of CFR's flagship magazine at ForeignAffairs.com or browse articles below.

Normal Countries

Authors: Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman

Twenty-five years after the Berlin Wall came down, a sense of missed opportunity hangs over the countries that once lay to its east.

See more in Europe; Development

The Strategic Logic of Trade

Author: Michael Froman

For much of the twentieth century, leaders and policymakers around the world viewed the strategic importance of trade, and of international economic policy more generally, largely through the lens of military strength.

See more in United States; International Finance

Culture War

Author: James Cuno

In December 2007, the Italian government opened an exhibition in Rome of 69 artifacts that four major U.S. museums had agreed to return to Italy on the grounds that they had been illegally excavated and exported from the country.

See more in Global; Society and Culture

Promises to Keep

Author: Bjorn Lomborg

The United Nations has always had lots of targets, goals, and declarations.

See more in Global; Development

Misrule of the Few

Author: Pavlos Eleftheriadis

Just a few years ago, Greece came perilously close to defaulting on its debts and exiting the eurozone. Today, thanks to the largest sovereign bailout in history, the country’s economy is showing new signs of life.

See more in Greece; Economics

The War That Didn't End All Wars

Author: Lawrence D. Freedman

The diplomat George Kennan described World War I as “the great seminal catastrophe” of the twentieth century, because it led to so many further catastrophes.

See more in Global; Wars and Warfare

Why They Fought

Author: Michael Mandelbaum

The philosopher Alfred North Whitehead once remarked that the history of European philosophy consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. For Ian Morris, world history may be understood as a series of footnotes to Thomas Hobbes.

See more in Global; Wars and Warfare

What Heidegger was Hiding

Author: Gregory Fried

The German philosopher Martin Heidegger died in 1976, yet scholars are still plowing through his life’s work today -- some of it for the very first time. Indeed, few modern thinkers have been as productive: once published in their entirety, his complete works will comprise over 100 volumes.

See more in Europe; Ethnicity, Minorities, and National Identity

A Reunified Theory

Authors: John Delury, Chung-in Moon, and Sue Mi Terry

North Korea’s implosion is imminent, South Korea’s absorption of the North will represent a boon to all, and policymakers in Washington and Seoul should start planning for a military intervention to reunify the Korean Peninsula -- at least according to Sue Mi Terry (“A Korea Whole and Free,” July/August 2014).

See more in North Korea; Regional Security

Pitchfork Politics

Author: Yascha Mounk

Since Roman times, virtually every type of government that holds competitive elections has experienced some form of populism -- some attempt by ambitious politicians to mobilize the masses in opposition to an establishment they depict as corrupt or self-serving.

See more in Global; Political Movements and Protests

Crashing the Party

Author: David Frum

For the six years since President George W. Bush left office, his party has turned its back on him. Bush spoke at neither the 2008 nor the 2012 Republican National Convention.

See more in United States; Polls and Opinion Analysis

The Right Stuff

Author: Byron York

This past January, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives held their annual winter retreat at a waterfront resort in Cambridge, Maryland.

See more in United States; Elections

A Woman of the People

Author: Michael Tomasky

Talk of the Republican Party’s internal divisions has become a staple of the American news diet. Battles between the conservative establishment and the Tea Party, over matters ranging from foreign policy to immigration, have played out on cable news channels like movie-house serials.

See more in United States; Elections

Banker to the Poor

Author: Jim Yong Kim

Conceived at the 1944 Bretton Woods conference to help rebuild postwar Europe, the World Bank has expanded over the ensuing 70 years into a global organization dedicated to promoting economic growth and reducing poverty -- goals it aims to meet by giving the billions of dollars in gets in contributions from developed countries to developing ones in the form of loans and grants. 

See more in Global; International Organizations and Alliances