Regions

Foreign Affairs Article

The Art of the Cell

Author: Marcelo Claure

A native of La Paz, Bolivia, Marcelo Claure graduated from Bentley College, in Waltham, Massachusetts, in 1993 with a degree in economics. His first job afterward was with the Bolivian Football Federation.

See more in Global; Economics

Foreign Affairs Article

Much Ventured, Much Gained

Author: Michael Moritz

Born in 1954 in Wales to Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, Michael Moritz attended Howardian High School in Cardiff and studied history at Christ Church, Oxford. After college, he moved to the United States, getting an MBA from Wharton and then working as a reporter for Time.

See more in United States; Entrepreneurship

Foreign Affairs Article

The Nordic Model

Author: Niklas Zennstrom

A native of Jarfalla, Sweden, Niklas Zennstrom studied business, engineering physics, and computer science at Uppsala University and the University of Michigan. In the mid-1990s, while heading up the Danish division of the Swedish telecommunications firm Tele2, he hired Janus Friis to run customer support, and soon the two of them decided to collaborate as entrepreneurs.

See more in Europe; Innovation

Foreign Affairs Article

Start-Up Slowdown

Author: Robert Litan

Americans like to think of their country as a cradle of innovation. After all, the United States has produced many of the world’s finest entrepreneurs, from Andrew Carnegie and Henry Ford to Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg.

See more in Global; Innovation

Foreign Affairs Article

Darkness Invisible

Authors: Thomas R. Insel, Pamela Y. Collins, and Steven E. Hyman

Four years ago, a team of scholars from the Harvard School of Public Health and the World Economic Forum prepared a report on the current and future global economic burden of disease.

See more in Global; Diseases, Noncommunicable

Foreign Affairs Article

The G-Word

Author: Thomas de Waal

One hundred years ago this April, the Ottoman Empire began a brutal campaign of deporting and destroying its ethnic Armenian community, whom it accused of supporting Russia, a World War I enemy. More than a million Armenians died.

See more in Armenia; Genocide