Regions

Article

How Trump's Foreign Policy Team Is Mastering Complex Challenges in Difficult Times

Author: Ray Takeyh
Washington Examiner

Thus far, President Donald J. Trump’s foreign policy resembles a traditionally realist Republican one that focuses on balance-of-power politics, dealing with other great powers on equal footing, and building coalitions for specific tasks, writes Ray Takeyh. In time, he may also recognize the importance of a robust human rights and democracy promotion policy.

See more in United States; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Article

Stop Supporting Palestinian Terror

Author: Elliott Abrams
National Review

Should Congress cut aid to the Palestinian Authority unless it ceases payments to terrorists and their families? In the new issue of National Review magazine, Elliott Abrams argues that Congress should pass the Taylor Force Act, cut the aid, and try to force a change in Palestinian political culture.

See more in Palestine; Israel; Conflict Assessment

Event

A Conversation With Benoît Cœuré

Speaker: Benoît Cœuré
Presider: Steven Liesman

Benoît Cœuré discusses his position on the Executive Board of the European Central Bank, the effectiveness of the bank’s Asset Purchase Program, and the impact on international capital flows.

See more in Europe; Eurozone

Op-Ed

How Will Trump Get Us From Tomahawks to the Peace Table?

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Defense One

While numerous questions remain as to how the Syrian conflict will end, all sides agree that talks should continue in Geneva. “The Geneva process is exhausting and frequently has felt futile,” writes Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, “…but it still exists and offers a framework to end these wars.”

See more in Syria; Russian Federation; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights; Treaties and Agreements

Article

Small Footprint, Small Payoff

Authors: Stephen D. Biddle, Julia Macdonald, and Ryan Baker
Journal of Strategic Studies

Stephen Biddle, Julia McDonald, and Ryan Baker argue that training, equipping, and advising partner militaries is an increasingly popular alternative to large U.S. ground force deployments in places like Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Ukraine, and many other places where the United States has real but limited interests at stake. Yet SFA has often yielded disappointing results in actual practice. The authors explain this pattern as the result of systematic interest misalignment between the United States and the partners it must work with in these kinds of missions—and argue that these problems are only partly remediable. The authors present ways to do better at the margin, but also argue that underlying interest misalignment will limit this tool's likely utility in the future, and that U.S. decision makers must take this into account when deciding when, where, and how to use it. 

See more in Iraq; Afghanistan; Defense and Security; Conflict Assessment