Americas

Op-Ed

Among High-Growth Firms, Reason for Optimism on Startups. (Really.)

Author: Robert E. Litan
Wall Street Journal

Think Tank readers know of my pessimism about the 30-year secular decline in the startup rate–the ratio of new U.S. firms with at least one employee as a share of all firms–through 2011. Labor Department data out Wednesday that looked at new firms and jobs created in the last quarter of 2015 showed how the numbers are down since the recession ended compared with pre-recession data.

See more in United States; Financial Markets

Foreign Affairs Article

Development's Gender Gap

Author: Rachel B. Vogelstein

Last week, U.S. President Barack Obama hosted a White House Summit on Global Development to map the future of U.S. development efforts. The meeting took place just as the United Nations has begun to measure progress toward the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, an ambitious set of goals to eradicate poverty adopted by the United States and 192 other nations last year.

See more in United States; Global; Women

Article

The Legal Legacy of Light-Footprint Warfare

Authors: Matthew C. Waxman and Jack Goldsmith
The Washington Quarterly

The expanded use of light-footprint warfare–including drones, cyber-operations, and Special Operations Forces–has established precedents constituting a remarkable legacy of presidential power to use military force, posing a distinctive challenge to U.S. democracy and military strategy ahead.

See more in United States; Wars and Warfare; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Op-Ed

U.S. Needs New South China Sea Strategy To Contain Beijing

Author: Jennifer M. Harris
Newsweek

On Tuesday, the United Nations Permanent Court of Arbitration issued its final ruling in a landmark case between the Philippines and China over disputed maritime claims in the South China Sea. The object of intense global interest, the three-year-old case has come to serve as a bellwether for the kind of rising power China intends to be.

See more in China; United States; Regional Security

Foreign Affairs Article

Can't Have It Both Ways in Iran

Authors: Reuel Marc Gerecht and Ray Takeyh

As the U.S. campaign season wears on, both Republicans and Democrats are pledging to stay tough on Iran. Such promises aren’t new. Last summer, as the Barack Obama administration unveiled its nuclear agreement, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry assured skeptics that the United States would sustain essential sanctions that punish Tehran for its aid to terrorists, regional aggression, and human rights abuses.

See more in Iran; United States; Treaties and Agreements; Public Health Threats and Pandemics