Asia and Pacific

Policy Innovation Memorandum No. 54

Addressing North Korea’s Nuclear Problem

Author: Scott A. Snyder

Since defecting from Six Party negotiations on denuclearization in 2008, North Korea has pursued nuclear development unchecked by international constraints. Scott A. Snyder outlines steps the United States should take to lead coordinated multilateral action opposing North Korea’s nuclear status, while still leaving a denuclearized North Korea a route for regime survival. 

See more in North Korea; Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

Contingency Planning Memorandum No. 27

Armed Confrontation Between China and India

Author: Daniel S. Markey

Although China and India have repeatedly demonstrated a mutual desire to prevent conflict, the potential for their relationship to deteriorate is ever present. A border clash, conflict with Pakistan, maritime skirmish, or crisis over Tibet could raise tensions to the point of armed confrontation. Daniel S. Markey explains how the United States can promote peaceful relations between the world's two largest countries.

See more in China; India; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Regional Security

Primary Sources

White House Fact Sheet: Advancing the Rebalance to Asia and the Pacific

During November 14-22, 2015, President Barack Obama traveled to Turkey for the G20 summit, to the Phillipines for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting, and to Malaysia for the East Asian and Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summits. After the summits, the White House released a fact sheet about the Obama Administration's rebalance or pivot to Asia.

See more in United States; Asia and Pacific; Grand Strategy

Primary Sources

Remarks by Assistant Secretary Russel: U.S.-Asia Policy Update

Daniel R. Russel, assistant secretary at the State Department's Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, spoke at The Asia Society in New York City on November 4, 2015. He discussed the Obama administration's "rebalance to Asia," which includes the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and developments in the region, such as maritime disputes and diplomatic meetings between leaders from China, Japan, and South Korea.

See more in United States; Asia and Pacific; Grand Strategy; Territorial Disputes

Primary Sources

Trans-Pacific Partnership

On October 4, 2015, the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations concluded, which included ministers from Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, United States, and Vietnam. The full text of the report was released a month later, on November 4, 2015.

See more in United States; Asia and Pacific; Trade

Primary Sources

Joint Declaration for Peace and Cooperation in Northeast Asia

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and South Korean President Park Geun-hye met in Seoul on November 1, 2015, for the Sixth Trilateral Summit, the first since 2012. The trilateral talks were proposed by South Korea in 2004 as a meeting outside of ASEAN to build cooperation on economic, humanitarian, security, and diplomatic issues. The first summit was held in Japan in 2008.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Regional Security; Emerging Markets