Asia and Pacific

Op-Ed

Why Air Disasters Keep Happening in Southeast Asia

Author: Joshua Kurlantzick
BusinessWeek

In the past year, Southeast Asia has suffered an unprecedented number of air travel-related tragedies. Josh Kurlantzick posits that the weak safety regulations of new low-cost carriers, air traffic controllers, and airspace in that part of the world, may lend insight into why several such tragedies have occurred in such close proximity to one another. 

See more in Asia and Pacific; Development

Op-Ed

Rebrand It However You Want, but Afghanistan Is Still at War

Author: Max Boot
Los Angeles Times

Imagine President Franklin Roosevelt announcing at the end of 1944, after the liberation of France but before the final defeat of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan, that World War II was over and that U.S. forces were ending combat operations. Instead we would support our allies, from Britain to China, in their fight against the Axis powers.

See more in Afghanistan; United States; Wars and Warfare; Terrorist Organizations and Networks

Audio

Media Conference Call: North Korean Cyberattack on Sony Pictures (Audio)

Speakers: Adam Segal and Scott A. Snyder
Presider: Robert McMahon

Adam Segal, CFR senior fellow for China studies, and Scott A. Snyder, CFR senior fellow for Korea studies, discussed the cyberattack on Sony Pictures and the studio's decision to cancel its release of The Interview, a comedy that reportedly depicts the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

See more in North Korea; Cybersecurity; Homeland Security

Op-Ed

Sorry, But North Korea Isn’t a State Sponsor of Terrorism

Author: Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

Senior administration officials have discussed the possibility of placing North Korea on the State Sponsor of Terrorism list after the hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment. Micah Zenko argues that North Korea is not a state-sponsor of terrorism and “rather than misapplying this outdated punishment against countries that the United States has non-terrorism-related disagreements with, an entirely new designation is necessary.”

See more in United States; North Korea; State Sponsors of Terrorism

Transcript

Media Conference Call: North Korean Cyberattack on Sony Pictures

Speakers: Adam Segal and Scott A. Snyder
Presider: Robert McMahon

Adam Segal, CFR senior fellow for China studies, and Scott A. Snyder, CFR senior fellow for Korea studies, discussed the cyberattack on Sony Pictures and the studio's decision to cancel its release of The Interview, a comedy that reportedly depicts the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

See more in North Korea; Cybersecurity; Homeland Security

Audio

Media Call on Peshawar School Attack

Following the Pakistani Taliban's December 2014 attack on a school in Peshawar, Pakistan, CFR Senior Fellow Daniel Markey and Adjunct Senior Fellow Farah Pandith discussed the attack itself, the Taliban, the Pakistani political scene, the attack's likely implications, and how this might relate to U.S. policy.

See more in Pakistan; Defense and Security

Op-Ed

A Review of "The Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan"

Author: Daniel S. Markey
Asian Affairs

Given the enormous threats facing [Pakistan]—from insurgency to environmental degradation to demographics—achieving performance-based legitimacy sufficient to challenge the military’s political dominance will likely remain a tall order for years, perhaps decades, to come, says CFR’s Daniel Markey.

See more in Pakistan; Defense and Security

Foreign Affairs Article

A Hard Education

Authors: Gideon Rose and Jonathan Tepperman

After 13 years of war, the loss of many thousands of lives, and the expenditure of trillions of dollars, what has the United States learned? The answer depends on not only who is asking but when.

See more in Afghanistan; Iraq; Wars and Warfare

Foreign Affairs Article

The Good War?

Author: Peter Tomsen

In the concluding pages of his fascinating memoir, War Comes to Garmser, Carter Malkasian, a Pashto-speaking U.S. diplomat who was stationed in a volatile region of Afghanistan in 2009–11, voices a fear shared by many of the Westerners who have participated in the Afghan war during the past 13 years: "The most frustrating thing about leaving Garmser in July 2011 and now watching it from afar is that I cannot be certain that the [Afghan] government will be able to stand on its own. ... The British and the Marines had put the government in a better position to survive than it had enjoyed in the past. What they had not done was create a situation in which the government was sure to win future battles against Taliban [fighters] coming out of Pakistan."

See more in Afghanistan; Defense and Security