Asia and Pacific

Foreign Affairs Article

Mutual Assured Production

Author: Richard Katz

Tensions between China and Japan are rising, but an economic version of mutual deterrence is preserving the uneasy status quo. Put simply, China needs to buy Japanese products as much as Japan needs to sell them.

See more in China; Japan; Trade

Foreign Affairs Article

Fake It Till You Make It

Authors: Kal Raustiala and Christopher Sprigman

Given that Chinese counterfeiting has benefits as well as costs, and considering China's historical resistance to Western pressure, trying to push China to change its approach to intellectual property law is not worth the political and diplomatic capital the United States is spending on it.

See more in China; Intellectual Property

Foreign Affairs Article

Why Drones Work

Author: Daniel Byman

The Obama administration relies on drones for one simple reason: they work. Drone strikes have devastated al Qaeda at little financial cost, at no risk to U.S. forces, and with fewer civilian casualties than many alternative methods would have caused.

See more in Somalia; Pakistan; Yemen; Drones

Foreign Affairs Article

India's Feeble Foreign Policy

Author: Manjari Chatterjee Miller

The world may expect great things from India, but as extensive reporting reveals, Indians themselves turn out to be deeply skeptical about their country's potential. That attitude, plus New Delhi's dysfunctional foreign-policy bureaucracy, prevent long-term planning of the sort China has mastered -- and are holding India back.

See more in India; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Beyond the Pivot

Author: Kevin Rudd

The Obama administration's "pivot" to Asia made sense, because China was starting to doubt U.S. staying power. Now that Washington has sent Beijing a clear message it will be around for the long haul, however, the time has come for the two countries to deepen and institutionalize their relationship in order to secure Asia's lasting peace and prosperity.

See more in China; United States; Politics and Strategy

Foreign Affairs Article

Breaking Up Is Not Hard to Do

Author: Husain Haqqani

Instead of continuing their endless battling, the United States and Pakistan should acknowledge that their interests simply do not converge enough to make them strong partners. Giving up the fiction of an alliance would free up Washington to explore new ways of achieving its goals in South Asia. And it would allow Islamabad to finally pursue its regional ambitions -- which would either succeed once and for all or, more likely, teach Pakistani officials the limitations of their country's power.

See more in Diplomacy and Statecraft; Pakistan

Foreign Affairs Article

Japan's Cautious Hawks

Author: Gerald L. Curtis

The election of the hawkish Shinzo Abe as Japan's prime minister has the world worrying that Tokyo is about to part with its pacifist strategy of the last 70 years. But Japan's new leaders are pragmatic, and so long as the United States does not waver in its commitment to the country's defense, they are unlikely chart a new course.

See more in Japan; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Foreign Affairs Article

The Evolution of Irregular War

Author: Max Boot

Pundits tend to treat terrorism and guerrilla tactics as something new, but nothing could be further from the truth. Although the agendas have changed over the years -- from tribalism, to liberalism and nationalism, to socialism, to jihadist extremism -- guerrilla and terrorist warfare has been ubiquitous throughout history and consistently deadly.

See more in Afghanistan; Wars and Warfare

Foreign Affairs Article

The Life of the Party

Author: Eric X. Li

In the next decade, China will continue to rise, not fade. Its leaders will consolidate the one-party model and, in the process, challenge the West's smug certainty about political development and the inevitable march toward electoral democracy.

See more in China; Democratization

Foreign Affairs Article

Smart Shift

Authors: Shawn Brimley and Ely Ratner

A recent essay by Robert Ross characterized the Obama administration's "pivot" to Asia as a hostile, knee-jerk response to Chinese aggression. But the shift was not aimed at any one country; it was an acknowledgment that the United States had underinvested in a strategically significant region.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Politics and Strategy; United States