Asia and Pacific

Op-Ed

In Bad Faith

Author: Daniel S. Markey
ForeignPolicy.com

The faltering of Pakistan's peace talks with its homegrown terrorists over the weekend offers Islamabad a chance to draw a clear line of defense around Pakistan's constitutional order, writes Daniel Markey.

See more in Pakistan; Terrorism

Primary Sources

Report of the UN Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

On 21 March 2013, the United Nations Human Rights Council established the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) through resolution A/HRC/RES/22/13. The commission investigated "the systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights" in North Korea and released a report on February 17, 2014 of their findings.

See more in North Korea; Human Rights

Must Read

Project Syndicate: China’s Risky Reforms

Authors: Ian Bremmer and David Gordon

"For outsiders, the reform process also poses risks that extend well beyond the global economic fallout of a sharp Chinese slowdown. The country's neighbors, particularly Japan, have the most to fear. If reforms become broadly unpopular or expose dangerous divisions within the leadership, the government will have good reason to divert public attention from controversies at home by picking fights abroad."

See more in China; Economics

Must Read

Carnegie Endowment: How India's Parliamentary Elections Work

An infographic on the upcoming elections in India, including an explanation what's at stake in 2014, a history of past elections, and information on the mechanics of the elections. The graphic explores the key parties and the formation of the national government as a whole. India's sixteenth general election is set to take place in late Spring 2014 once the term expires for the current Lok Sabha on May 31, 2014.

See more in India; Elections

Transcript

Fueling the Chinese Economy

Speakers: Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael A. Levi
Presider: James M. Lindsay

China's growing demand for natural resources has been a boon for commodity producers, but it has also raised concerns about its effects on the global economy. Following the publication of their new book, By All Means Necessary: How China's Resource Quest is Changing the World, CFR Fellows Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael Levi join CFR's Director of Studies James M. Lindsay to discuss some of their findings.

See more in China; Economics

Must Read

Financial Times: Obama Walks Into Crossfire of Asian Tensions

Authors: Geoff Dyer, Demetri Sevastopulo, and Simon Mundy

"The U.S. has been particularly frustrated at the deterioration in relations between Tokyo and Seoul, as it believes that relationship is important to help check the rise of China in the region, which is one reason that some high-profile Asia experts in the US have been urging Mr Obama to visit South Korea."

See more in Japan; South Korea; Economic Development; Global Governance

Primary Sources

Assistant Secretary Russel's Congressional Testimony on Maritime Disputes in East Asia

Assistant Secretary of East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel testified before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on February 5, 2014. He discussed tensions in East Asia sea, China's announcement of its Air Defense Identification Zone, and U.S. role in maintaining relations.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Territorial Disputes; Oceans

News Release

CFR Scholars Economy and Levi Debunk Myths about China’s Resource Quest, in New Book

China's meteoric growth and transformation into a major economic power is demanding ever-larger quantities of energy, minerals, land, and water. In a sweeping new book, Senior Fellow for Asia Studies Elizabeth C. Economy and Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment Michael Levi show how China's quest to secure those resources is changing the world—and China itself.

See more in China; Energy and Environment

Audio

Fueling the Chinese Economy

Speakers: Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael A. Levi
Presider: James M. Lindsay

China's growing demand for natural resources has been a boon for commodity producers, but it has also raised concerns about its effects on the global economy. Following the publication of their new book, By All Means Necessary: How China's Resource Quest is Changing the World, CFR Fellows Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael Levi join CFR's Director of Studies James M. Lindsay to discuss some of their findings.

See more in China; Economics

Video

Fueling the Chinese Economy

Speakers: Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael A. Levi
Presider: James M. Lindsay

China's growing demand for natural resources has been a boon for commodity producers, but it has also raised concerns about its effects on the global economy. Following the publication of their new book, By All Means Necessary: How China's Resource Quest is Changing the World, CFR Fellows Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael Levi join CFR's Director of Studies James M. Lindsay to discuss some of their findings.

See more in China; Economics

Must Read

The Diplomat: Japan and Russia: Arctic Friends

Author: Stratos Pourzitakis

"Through its warming ties with Russia, Japan seeks to exploit the Arctic's potential and to win support in standing up to what it regards as China's assertive policies. Working with Russia is a great opportunity for Japan to strengthen ties with the most important player in the Arctic and gain leverage within the Arctic Council. It will also give Japanese energy and maritime corporations and scientific institutions valuable Arctic access."

See more in Japan; Russia and Central Asia; Energy Policy

Ask CFR Experts

If there are no U.S. or NATO troops in Afghanistan after 2014, what happens?

Asked by Tom Gordon

There are good reasons to worry about a precipitous departure of U.S. and NATO troops from Afghanistan. The country remains fragile and the Taliban still threaten key areas. Withdrawing all troops would leave the Afghans to fend for themselves against a resurgent Taliban. And because the United States uses its presence to monitor and target al-Qaeda and other threats, such as the proliferation of nuclear weapons from the region, leaving the country completely would mean having less warning or ability to respond.

Read full answer

See more in Afghanistan; Defense and Security