Asia and Pacific

Op-Ed

In Afghanistan, Path to Lasting Success Will Also Be the Hardest

Authors: Janine Davidson and Emerson Brooking
Council on Foreign Relations

Janine Davidson and Emerson Brooking assess potential glideslopes for U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in wake of the April 5 presidential elections. The most effective plan for U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan will be phased and gradual—but this will likely be incompatible with American public opinion.

See more in Afghanistan; Elections; Development

Ask CFR Experts

What will be the effect of India's general election on relations with its neighbors, the EU, and the United States?

Asked by Najibullah Adamji, from Mithibai College, Mumbai University

Historically, India's foreign policy has not oscillated on a partisan basis, exemplifying the American adage: politics stops at the water's edge. This doesn't mean politics has no effect on foreign policy in India; it is, however, more attenuated with powers farther away, and amplified with smaller neighbors.

Read full answer

See more in India; Elections

Op-Ed

China Runs Into Natural-Resources Pushback

Authors: Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael A. Levi
Wall Street Journal

Though strategists have long feared that China's quest for natural resources would lead to ever-higher prices, a breakdown in trade, and perhaps even wars, Elizabeth Economy and Michael Levi write that a stunning WTO rebuke of Chinese exports restrictions shows that the global system is far more resilient than the worriers have claimed.

See more in China; Energy and Environment

Testimony

Health-care Provision and Health-care Reform in Post-Mao China

Author: Yanzhong Huang

An effective strategy to engage China's health-care sector requires the U.S. government to continue promoting business opportunities for U.S. biopharmaceutical firms, hospital groups, and insurance companies, CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health Yanzhong Huang tells the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. In the meantime, it is also important for the U.S. government and companies to demonstrate the willingness to work with China in addressing health issues of their immediate concern.

See more in China; Health

Must Read

The Diplomat: U.S.-Japan Relations: Not So Sweet Caroline

Author: Yo-jung Chen

"America, which badly needs stability in East Asia and a solid U.S.-Japan-South Korea alliance in order to face an assertive—but indispensible—China and an unpredictable North Korea, has been disturbed by the worsening tensions between Japan and its two neighbors under Abe's watch. Although Japan may not be the only party to blame in these quarrels, Washington is increasingly irritated by what it sees as Abe's unhelpful flexing of nationalism that has served only to aggravate an already precarious situation in Asia."

See more in Japan; Politics and Strategy

Must Read

Economist: Holding Back Half the Nation

"By 2020 Mr Abe wants women to occupy 30% of all "leadership" positions—which would include members of parliament, heads of local government and corporate executives. His most practical step has been to try to shorten waiting lists for child care by allowing more private companies into a previously state-dominated sector."

See more in Japan; Development

Video

India's Change Election

Speaker: Alyssa Ayres

More than eight hundred million Indians will head to the polls next month to elect a new government that must tackle corruption and a fizzling economy, explains CFR's Alyssa Ayres.

See more in India; Elections

Op-Ed

How to Avoid a Naval War With China

Authors: William J. Parker III and Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

Though tensions between the United States and China are high, a war between the two countries is not preordained, write Micah Zenko and William Parker III. There are numerous tools available to avert possible escalation, which, if applied properly, could lead to positive near and long term implications.

See more in China; United States; Sovereignty; Wars and Warfare

Must Read

New York Times Magazine: What Pakistan Knew About Bin Laden

Author: Carlotta Gall

"America's failure to fully understand and actively confront Pakistan on its support and export of terrorism is one of the primary reasons President Karzai has become so disillusioned with the United States. As American and NATO troops prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of this year, the Pakistani military and its Taliban proxy forces lie in wait, as much a threat as any that existed in 2001."

See more in Pakistan; Terrorism