Asia and Pacific

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FP: Will India's Next Leader Be Banned from America?

Author: John Hudson

"Pollsters say the BJP is now widely expected to win next year's general election, which would make the party's controversial prime ministerial nominee, Narendra Modi, the next leader of India. The State Department won't say whether a Prime Minister Modi would be allowed entrance to the United States, but experts say the question looms large over the U.S.-India relationship."

See more in India; Politics and Strategy

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The Diplomat: U.S.-Japan Alliance Sparks Korean Grand Strategy Debate

Author: Robert E. Kelly

"To join a U.S.-Japanese anti-Chinese coalition would not only antagonize China, it would align Korea with its "ancient foe." Worse, the mutual U.S. alliances mean that nationalists and maximalists in Korea and Japan can make whatever outrageous claims they like about the other, yet face little geopolitical consequence. U.S. alliances are a form of "moral hazard" that ironically worsen the problem by reducing the incentives for rapprochement."

See more in Asia and Pacific; Defense and Security

Ask CFR Experts

What action, if any, should be taken by outside actors to support reform in Myanmar?

Asked by Talee
Author: Joshua Kurlantzick

Despite impressive changes over the past three years, Myanmar (or Burma) now faces growing insecurity and rising disappointment among citizens that reform has not brought higher standards of living. Interethnic and interreligious unrest now threaten to halt reforms altogether, depress much-needed investment, and could even lead to broader regional tensions.

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See more in Burma/Myanmar; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights; Economics

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New Yorker: Pakistan’s Next Top General

Author: Omar Waraich

"All of these steps are meant to ensure that the prime minister, and not the Army chief, is the most powerful Sharif in Pakistan. But that status is not easy to guarantee: before he was toppled by Musharraf, in 1999, Sharif thought that his position was invulnerable, thanks to a landslide victory that gave him an overwhelming majority in Parliament. If the direct threat of a coup has receded, today Sharif faces a broader array of checks on his power."

See more in Pakistan; Politics and Strategy