Brazil

News Release

Resources on the Olympics From CFR and Foreign Affairs

The 2016 Summer Olympics begin in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, this Friday, August 5. To help better understand the full significance of the Olympic games, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and Foreign Affairs offer resources on the games' political, economic, and health implications for Brazil and the world.

See more in Brazil; Health

Article

Some Parts of the Brazilian Government Actually Aren’t Corrupt. Here’s What They Have in Common.

Authors: Katherine Bersch, Sérgio Praça, and Matthew M. Taylor
Washington Post

The massive “Lava Jato” (car wash) corruption scandal cut a wide swath across the Brazilian political landscape, contributing to public outcry against President Dilma Rousseff. Brazil’s Senate voted to suspend Rousseff in May, pending her impeachment trial on alleged budgetary improprieties.

See more in Brazil; Corruption and Bribery; Politics and Strategy

Event

Brazil Update

Speaker: Shannon K. O'Neil
Presider: Michael T. Derham

CFR's Shannon K. O'Neil analyzes of the impeachment of Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and the implications for Brazil’s economy and its ability to govern in the coming months.

See more in Brazil; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

"Torture" or Torture

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

Following last weeks near simultaneous release of torture reports in Brazil and the United States, Julia Sweig reflects in her column on the similarities and differences between the two documents, including the shared matter of impunity.

See more in Brazil; Human Rights

Op-Ed

Questions for Dilma 2.0

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

Following elections in both Brazil and the United States, Julia Sweig reflects in her column on potential ways to kickstart bilateral collaboration between the two countries over the next couple of years.

See more in Brazil; Elections

Op-Ed

Now for the Reforms

Author: Valerie Wirtschafter
Huffington Post

Valerie Wirtschafter reflects on the road ahead for Brazil, following a contested campaign where change was an empty buzzword used by both candidates. With Dilma Rousseff back in office for a second term, one thing is certain: she will now have to make a visible effort to deliver on her promises for reform.

See more in Brazil; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

Wall Street, Washington, and Brazil

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

Following the first round elimination of "change candidate" Marina Silva in Brazil's presidential election, Julia Sweig reflects in her column on the run-off between establishment candidates Dilma Rousseff and Aecio Neves and their potential to implement much-needed reforms throughout the country.

See more in Brazil; Elections

Interview

A Presidential Protest Vote in Brazil?

Matias Spektor interviewed by Danielle Renwick

With the economy in recession, public infrastructure projects lagging, and last year's protests still resonating, the public mood in Brazil is far less optimistic than when Dilma Rousseff rose to the presidency in 2010.

See more in Brazil; Elections

Op-Ed

Marina's "Post-Racial" Brazil

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

With less than one month until Brazil's elections kick-off, Julia Sweig highlights the significance of the heated race between current President Dilma Rousseff and "dark horse" candidate Marina Silva.

See more in Brazil; Elections