China

Article

Holding Sway

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen says the Communist Party's sustained efforts since June 4 to influence China's courts for its own ends may be easing, but judicial independence is still a long way off.

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What are the costs and benefits of China's relationship with North Korea?

Asked by Garrett Smith, from Stanford University

Chinese officials see stability on the Korean peninsula under the Korean Armistice as a component that has enabled China's growth for over three decades. Despite a growing difference between the economic systems of China and North Korea, China's communist party leadership feels an affinity with North Korea because its government, like China's, pursues one-party leadership under a socialist banner.

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See more in China; North Korea; Foreign Aid

Article

China’s Environmental Future: The Power of the People

Author: Elizabeth C. Economy
McKinsey Quarterly

The costs of China's deep and enduring environmental crisis are growing, yet Beijing's response to the country's environmental challenges has been far from sufficient. Increasingly, the Chinese people are pushing the government to do more to protect the environment, and Beijing must rise to the occasion, says Elizabeth Economy.

See more in China; Energy and Environment; Environmental Policy; Politics and Strategy

Article

China-Korea Relations: Seeking Alignment on North Korean Policy

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and See-won Byun
Comparative Connections

Escalating tensions on the peninsula due to North Korea's recent provocations motivate Presidents Xi Jinping and Park Geun-hye to closely coordinate policies toward the North. However, Beijing's shifty stance on sanctions, an increase in Sino-DPRK economic exchanges, and the obstacles to China-South Korea-Japan trilateral cooperation impede North Korea policy alignment between Beijing and Seoul. Still, the willingness of both leaders to improve bilateral relations offers a silver lining, explain CFR's Scott Snyder and See-won Byun of George Washington University.

See more in China; South Korea; Defense and Security

Op-Ed

Shaming Chinese Hackers Won't Work Because Cyber Espionage is Here to Stay

Author: Adam Segal
The Guardian

In preparation for President Xi Jinping and President Barack Obama's meeting in California on June 7-9, Adam Segal writes, "The presidents won't come to any agreements next week, but over the course of the two days, they should try and dispel the growing mistrust by explaining their national interests and intentions in cyberspace."

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; China

Op-Ed

Asian Tensions and the Problem of History

Author: Jonathan Tepperman
International Herald Tribune

A recent gaffe by Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe exposes the tense relations between Japan, China, and South Korea, and "helps explain why the region seems on the brink of not one by several conflicts," says Jonathan Tepperman.

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What are the implications of growing Pakistan-China commercial relations for the United States?

Asked by Monish Gulati, from New Delhi, India

The first foreign leader to visit Pakistan following its recent elections was the prime minister of China, signifying the close relations between the two countries. During the visit, Pakistani president Asif Ali Zardari said, "Our top priority is to further strengthen economic linkages."

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See more in China; Pakistan; Trade

Primary Sources

Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property (The IP Commission) Report, May 2013

The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property (The IP Commission), with members from the "private sector and public service in national security and foreign affairs, academe, and politics," released its report on May 22, 2013. The Commission addresses theft by cyber means and pinpoints China as a main concern.

See more in United States; China; Intellectual Property

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Why did the United States reestablish diplomatic relations with communist states like China and Vietnam?

Asked by Michael Varacalli, from New York University

The United States did not have diplomatic relations with mainland China in the late 1940s after the communist takeover (though theoretically it maintained diplomatic relations through ties with Taiwan). The United States ended diplomatic relations with Vietnam following the Vietnam War in 1975.

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See more in China; Vietnam; Diplomacy and Statecraft