Cuba

Online Debate

U.S. Engagement with a Post-Castro Cuba

U.S.-Cuban relations have been virtually nonexistent since 1961, when the United States assumed a two-pronged policy of economic embargo and diplomatic isolation. Now that Fidel has transferred power to his younger brother, Raul, some experts think the United States should reconsider its policy toward Cuba. Philip Peters of the Lexington Institute and Dennis Hays, the State Department's former Coordinator for Cuban Affairs, debate how the United States should engage with a post-Castro Cuba.

See more in Cuba; Diplomacy and Statecraft; United States

Analysis Brief

Cuba’s Slow Motion Change

After Fidel Castro transferred power to his younger brother, Raul, in early August, analysts have been watching Cuba closely and speculating about a post-Castro Cuba. But little has changed under Raul, and attention has shifted to the roles of Venezuela and the United States as both seek to influence Cuba’s future.

See more in Cuba; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Interview

Latell: A Post-Fidel Cuba Likely to Experiment with Economic Reforms

Brian Latell interviewed by Bernard Gwertzman

Brian Latell, who for many years was the CIA’s top Cuban and Latin American analyst, says if Fidel Castro is unable to recover from his ailments his successors are likely to be more willing to experiment with economic reforms. He also recommends the Bush administration establish formal contacts with the Cuban military.

See more in Cuba; Economic Development

Analysis Brief

Castro, Sick, Bows to Brother Raul

Fidel Castro's government says the Cuban leader has ceded power temporarily to his younger brother Raul to allow the revolutionary icon to recover from gastro-intestinal surgery. It marks the first time since 1959 power has been exercised by anyone but the "maximum leader," piquing the interest of analysts abroad.

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Book

Inside the Cuban Revolution

Author: Julia E. Sweig

Council Senior Fellow Julia Sweig shatters the mythology surrounding the Cuban Revolution in a compelling revisionist history that reconsiders the roles of Fidel Castro and Che Guevara and restores, to a central position, the leadership of the Cuban urban underground, the Llano.

See more in Cuba; Politics and Strategy