Egypt

Video

What to Do About Egypt

Speakers: Thomas Carothers, Daniel C. Kurtzer, and Shibley Telhami
Presider: Richard N. Haass

With the Muslim Brotherhood sidelined for the time being and the military once again firmly in charge, the Egyptian political landscape has settled into a three-way stalemate between the Islamists, secular liberals, and old-guard elites.

See more in Egypt; Organization of Government

Audio

What to Do About Egypt

Speakers: Thomas Carothers, Daniel C. Kurtzer, and Shibley Telhami
Presider: Richard N. Haass

With the Muslim Brotherhood sidelined for the time being and the military once again firmly in charge, the Egyptian political landscape has settled into a three-way stalemate between the Islamists, secular liberals, and old-guard elites.

See more in Egypt; Organization of Government

Must Read

Carnegie: Egypt’s Draft Constitution Rewards the Military and Judiciary

Authors: Nathan J. Brown and Michele Dunne

"Egyptian voters might well be asked to approve the new constitution without knowing much about when their new president and parliament will be elected or what sort of system will govern the parliament. They may not know whether the defense minister who ousted Morsi will run for president or whether a malleable civilian will be put forward for the job. They may not even know whether the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party will be dissolved and therefore banned from running for seats in parliament. All these are salient points, because the vote in January will be more a popular referendum on the July 2013 coup than one on the draft constitution itself, which few are likely to read."

See more in Egypt; Politics and Strategy

Transcript

What to Do About Egypt

Speakers: Thomas Carothers, Daniel C. Kurtzer, and Shibley Telhami
Presider: Richard N. Haass

With the Muslim Brotherhood sidelined for the time being and the military once again firmly in charge, the Egyptian political landscape has settled into a three-way stalemate between the Islamists, secular liberals, and old-guard elites.

This meeting is part of the "What to Do About" series, which highlights specific issues and features experts who put forward competing analyses and policy prescriptions in a mock high-level U.S. government meeting.

See more in Egypt; Organization of Government

Must Read

Reuters: Moderates Fade From Political View in Polarized Egypt

Author: Yara Bayoumy

"Moderate voices have been drowned out in the Egyptian media which largely glorifies the army and its chief, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. An absence of established political parties to encourage dynamic pluralist politics has also pushed moderate politicians into the background while the public, weary of instability, mostly backs the army in its 'war against terrorism.'"

See more in Egypt; Politics and Strategy

Must Read

Cairo Review of Global Affairs: Freezing Aid without a Strategy

Author: Jonathan Guyer

"Beltway analysts draw the same conclusion: U.S. aid has not bought leverage over Egypt. Their argument is that cutting aid is futile and actually detracts from U.S. interests. It's quite a tautology. Since American assistance doesn't buy leverage, Washington should keep the aid flowing. If we agree that American assistance doesn't do much, then why continue it?"

See more in Egypt; Defense Strategy

Must Read

BBC: The Cost of Cutting U.S. Aid to Egypt

Author: Kim Ghattas

"Weapon systems, just like cars, are bought on credit. Most countries receiving [Foreign Military Funding] aid are required to show they have the funds to cover the full cost of the order, and the value of their orders cannot exceed the credit extended by the US. But Egypt was offered a credit arrangement more generous than most."

See more in Egypt; Foreign Aid

Must Read

TIME: Egypt No Longer Matters

Author: Bobby Ghosh

"It seems now that [Egypt's] main relevance in regional and global affairs is as a potential source of trouble. Its combination of instability, corruption and ineptitude makes Egypt fertile soil for radicalism and Islamist militancy. And Washington should treat it as such. It should stop pretending Egypt is an important player in Arab affairs, and pay more attention to countries that are."

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Op-Ed

Democracy in Egypt Can Wait

Author: Charles A. Kupchan
New York Times

Washington should temper its push for democracy in Egypt and the wider Mideast, focusing more on helping transitional states govern responsibly and peaceably, says CFR's Charles Kupchan.

See more in Egypt; Democratization