Egypt

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Should the United States continue to provide economic aid to Egypt?

The Egyptian uprising presents a rare opportunity for the United States to resolve the tension between its strategic priorities in the Middle East and its desire to support democratic change in the region. Washington's past approach to aiding Egypt was based on relations with authoritarian leaders who could be counted on to advance the United States' interests. With the fall of Hosni Mubarak and Egyptian efforts to build a more open political system, a policy based on "authoritarian stability" is no longer possible, and the United States is now forced to alter the way it appropriates and distributes bilateral assistance.

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See more in Egypt; Foreign Aid

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Egypt Update

Speaker: Steven A. Cook

Steven A. Cook leads a conversation on the current situation in Egypt, including Sisi's influence and the sweeping convictions handed down to Muslim Brotherhood sympathizers, as part of CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Conference Call series.

See more in Egypt; Religion

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Egypt's Turbulent Transition

Speakers: Michele Dunne and Michael Wahid Hanna
Presider: Isobel Coleman

Michele Dunne, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Michael Wahid Hanna, senior fellow at the Century Foundation, discuss Egypt's turbulent transition, the prospects for stabilization and economic progress in the country, and possible U.S. foreign policy responses toward the ongoing political crisis.

See more in Egypt; Regime Changes

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What to Do About Egypt

Speakers: Thomas Carothers, Daniel C. Kurtzer, and Shibley Telhami
Presider: Richard N. Haass

With the Muslim Brotherhood sidelined for the time being and the military once again firmly in charge, the Egyptian political landscape has settled into a three-way stalemate between the Islamists, secular liberals, and old-guard elites.

See more in Egypt; Organization of Government