Egypt

Article

Egypt’s Financial High Noon

Author: Isobel Coleman
Foreign Policy

Isobel Coleman writes that while it is widely recognized that food and fuel subsidies in Egypt are expensive and inefficient, Egyptian leaders do not want to touch the political third rail of subsidy reform. But they also realize that the country's fiscal situation is untenable without it. Sooner or later, serious subsidy reform is inevitable, and a well-planned process is preferable to the alternative.

See more in Egypt; Economic Development

Ask CFR Experts

Should the United States continue to provide economic aid to Egypt?

The Egyptian uprising presents a rare opportunity for the United States to resolve the tension between its strategic priorities in the Middle East and its desire to support democratic change in the region. Washington's past approach to aiding Egypt was based on relations with authoritarian leaders who could be counted on to advance the United States' interests. With the fall of Hosni Mubarak and Egyptian efforts to build a more open political system, a policy based on "authoritarian stability" is no longer possible, and the United States is now forced to alter the way it appropriates and distributes bilateral assistance.

Read full answer

See more in Egypt; Foreign Aid

Interview

Egypt's Struggle for Power

Marina Ottaway interviewed by Bernard Gwertzman

In an interview with CFR.org, Middle East expert Marina Ottaway discusses the political dynamics behind the struggle for power in Egypt between Islamist and secular parties.

See more in Egypt

Op-Ed

Morsi's Miscalculation

Author: Steven A. Cook
Daily Beast

Steven A. Cook says, "This is a critical moment in Egypt's transition; Morsi and his colleagues would do well to recognize that, rescind the decrees, and commit themselves to the democratic process. At this point, it is the only way for the Brothers to burnish their revolutionary credentials."

See more in Democratization; Egypt