Europe

Primary Sources

President Obama's Remarks on Europe

President Barack Obama spoke at the Palais Des Beaux Arts in Brussels on March 26, 2014. He spoke about the history of formation of democracies in Europe and the importance of maintaining European regional security and the sovereignty of individual countries. President Obama argued for the United States and other countries to support Ukraine and to isolate the Russian government after Russia's annexation of Crimea.

See more in Europe; Russian Federation; Democratization; International Law

Primary Sources

The Hague Declaration

Leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, the President of the European Council, and the President of the European Commission met in The Hague and released this statement on March 24, 2014. In the joint document, the leaders declares their support for Ukraine's sovereignty and their rejection of Russia's annexation of Crimea. The document states that the leaders will not attend the G8 meeting in Sochi in June 2014, but will convene as the G7 in Brussels.

See more in Ukraine; Russian Federation; International Organizations and Alliances; Territorial Disputes

Primary Sources

EU-Ukraine Association Agreement

According to a press release from the European Union, EU-Ukraine Association Agreement is the "first agreement based on political association between the EU and any of the Eastern Partnership countries, and is unprecedented in its breadth (number of areas covered) and depth (detail of commitments and timelines)." After Russia presented an alternative trade agreement, the President of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych, did not sign the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement. Yanukovych was removed from power through revolution in February 2014 and Ukranian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk signed the political section of the agreement on March 21, 2014.

See more in EU; Ukraine; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Must Read

Foreign Policy: Russia's Invasion of Ukraine Has Big Implications for Asia's Energy Future

Author: Keith Johnson

"In a nutshell, Asia's biggest economies think they are becoming even more of a buyer's market for Russian energy, and hope to use Moscow's current turmoil to buy more gas for lower prices. If they're right, countries like China and South Korea would gain a longer-term, cheaper source of energy, while Moscow would be able to keep tapping its mineral wealth for decades to come."

See more in Ukraine; Energy Policy

Interview

NATO's Next Moves

Christopher S. Chivvis interviewed by Jonathan Masters

NATO's response to Russia's annexation of Crimea may require it to bolster eastern European members with both military and non-military actions, says expert Christopher S. Chivvis.

See more in Ukraine; NATO

Must Read

Financial Times: Prise Ukraine From Putin’s Claws

Author: Martin Wolf

"The west is not going to war with a nuclear-armed Russia. But outright annexation of a part of a smaller country strikes at the roots of the post-second world war European settlement. Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, was right to say that Russia had resorted to the "law of the jungle". This annexation cannot go unanswered. It is too dangerous a precedent."

See more in Ukraine; Territorial Disputes