Global

Event

Foreign Affairs January Issue Launch: Out of Order? The Future of the International System

Speaker: Joseph S. Nye Jr.
Speaker: Kori Schake
Presider: Gideon Rose

Gideon Rose discusses the January/February 2017 issue of Foreign Affairs magazine with contributors Joseph S. Nye Jr. and Kori Schake. The latest issue of Foreign Affairs takes an in-depth look at the future of the liberal international order, and the role of the United States within it.

See more in Global; Foreign Aid; NATO

News Release

CFR President Richard Haass Explains In New Book How We Arrived at "A World in Disarray" and What to Do About It

Author: Richard N. Haass

“These are no ordinary times. It will not be business as usual in a world of disarray; as a result, it cannot be foreign policy as usual,” writes Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), in his latest book, A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order—a timely examination of a world increasingly defined by disorder. In three parts, the book contemplates the history of world order from the rise of the modern state system to the end of the Cold War; accounts for the momentous shifts in the last quarter century to shed light on the current state of affairs, and outlines specific steps to tackle the many challenges ahead.

See more in Global; Politics and Strategy

Article

Unlocking Clean Energy

Author: Varun Sivaram
Issues in Science and Technology

Many government policies now "lock in" mature clear energy technologies while blocking out innovative alternatives. Here's Varun Sivaram's plan to transform lock-in barriers into bridges for technological succession.

See more in Global; Energy and Environment

Other Report

Global Economics Monthly January 2017

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn writes that markets showed impressive resilience in the face of a range of geopolitical shocks in 2016, but recent market moves suggest this year could be different. A greater range of possible, if unlikely, political challenges, as well as U.S. monetary policy normalization, could bring a crisis back to the fore. 

See more in Global; Economics