Latin America and the Caribbean

Must Read

Wall Street Journal: Latin Migrants Shift Sights From U.S. to Neighbors

Author: Miriam Jordan

"In a noticeable and important shift in global migratory patterns, millions of migrant workers are no longer relying on the U.S. as heavily as they did for better-paying jobs that allowed them to send money home to families in Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia. Instead, they have moved more to developing economies, creating a shift in money transfers out of countries like Chile, Brazil and Malaysia."

See more in Latin America and the Caribbean; Immigration

Op-Ed

Moral Obscenity, Global Red Line

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

Julia Sweig argues that, while skepticism of military intervention is reasonable in normal times, the use of chemical weapons in Syria has changed the goalposts and demands action from the world. In spite of its painful memories of U.S. intervention in its own recent history, Latin America should invoke the doctrine of Responsibility while Protecting, and partner with Western leaders as a source of humanitarian aid and refugee assistance.

See more in Syria; Latin America and the Caribbean; Politics and Strategy; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

Op-Ed

Arms, the United States, and the Americas

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

The issue of gun control is far from limited to the domestic politics of the United States: transnational gun trafficking makes armed violence a continental problem. The United States and Brazil, home to the largest arms industries in the Hemisphere, should partner to safeguard weapons stocks and staunch the flow of illegal weapons to illicit groups writes Julia Sweig.

See more in Latin America and the Caribbean; Mexico; United States; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation

Ask CFR Experts

In a post-Chavez era, how can the U.S. rebuild Latin American ties?

Asked by Joel Cerda, from University of Maryland

Hugo Chávez ruled Venezuela from 1999 until his death in 2013. It is tempting to assume that ties between the United States and Latin America broke during the Chávez era, and that they must now be repaired. The reality, however, is more complex: despite the heated rhetoric coming from Washington and Caracas during Chávez's presidency, bilateral trade quadrupled from $16 billion in 1998 to $64 billion in 2008.

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See more in Venezuela; Politics and Strategy