Mexico

Event

A Conversation with Felipe Calderón

Speaker: Felipe Calderón
Presider: Carla Hills

Please join President Calderón during one of his final international trips to discuss recent developments in Mexico, bilateral relations with the United States, and the country's role on the international stage.

**Please note the special timing.**

See more in Mexico; United States

Event

200 Years of U.S.-Mexico Relations:Challenges for the 21st Century

12:00 to 12:30 PM Buffet Lunch

12:30 to 1:45 PM SESSION ONE:
U.S.-Mexico Relations Today
Carlos Pascual, Ambassador of the United States to Mexico
Arturo Sarukhan, Ambassador of Mexico to the United States
Presider: Ray Suarez, Senior Correspondent, PBS NewsHour

1:45 to 2:00 PM Break

2:00 to 3:15 PM SESSION TWO:
The Future of Bilateral Security Cooperation
Jorge Chabat, Professor, Department of International Studies, Center for Research and Teaching in Economics, Mexico City
Alfredo Corchado, Mexico Bureau Chief, Dallas Morning News; Visiting Scholar, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University
Frances Townsend, Senior Vice President, MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, Inc.; Former Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, The White House (2005-2007)
Presider: Garrick Utley, President, Levin Institute

3:15 to 3:30 PM Break

3:30 to 5:00 PM SESSION THREE:
Beyond NAFTA: Raising Cross-Border Competitiveness
Jorge Mariscal, Partner and Director of Investment Research, Rohatyn Group; Adjunct Professor of International Affairs, Columbia University
Shannon K. O'Neil, Douglas Dillon Fellow for Latin American Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Juan Pardinas, Director of Public Finance, Mexican Institute for Competitiveness
Presider: Ana Paula Ordorica, Journalist, Televisa/Grupo Imagen

See more in Mexico; United States; Immigration

Must Read

New Yorker: The Hunt For El Chapo

Author: Patrick Radden Keefe

"[Joaquin] Guzman has been characterized by the U.S. Treasury Department as "the world's most powerful drug trafficker," and after the killing of Osama bin Laden, three years ago, he became perhaps the most wanted fugitive on the planet. Mexican politicians promised to bring him to justice, and the U.S. offered a five-million-dollar reward for information leading to his capture. But part of Guzmán's fame stemmed from the perception that he was uncatchable, and he continued to thrive, consolidating control of key smuggling routes and extending his operation into new markets in Europe, Asia, and Australia. According to one study, the Sinaloa cartel is now active in more than fifty countries."

See more in Mexico; Politics and Strategy